District Offers Homeowners Water- and Money-Saving Tips As Irrigation Season is Set to Begin


“Outdoor water usage is the single largest contributor to the District’s increased pumpage between May and September,” said Marc Laykind, Chairman of the Plainview Water District. “To accommodate for the increased use, we have to use every bit of our infrastructure to meet demand and that each drop meets all federal, state and local guidelines. If every resident could introduce a new water-saving measure this summer it would go a long way in preserving our most precious natural resource.”

Irrigation clocks that are set in April and then not touched again until they are turned off in the fall are primed to waste thousands upon thousands of gallons of water. This is because a lawn’s water needs are drastically different in April than they are in July. A trick to keep in mind is to set irrigation clocks every time the thermostat is adjusted. A less time-consuming option is to consider technologies such as a rain sensor or a smart controller. Smart controllers replace standard irrigation timers and use Wi-Fi to connect to a local weather station to use data to adjust watering schedules and amounts accordingly.

“We pump more than 100 percent more water in the spring and summer than we do the rest of the year, and it’s essentially all attributed to lawn sprinkler systems,” said Plainview Water District Commissioner Amanda Field. “That is why it is so important for residents to understand how to optimize their home irrigation systems. Their efforts will not only contribute to the long-term sustainability of our aquifer, but it will have a real impact on their second and third quarter water bills.”

Plainview Old-Bethpage residents are also reminded of Nassau County’s Lawn Watering Ordinances, which dictates when homeowners can and cannot water their lawns. The ordinance stipulates that even-numbered homes can only water on even-numbered days, odd-numbered homes can only water on odd-numbered days, and no lawn watering can be done between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on any day.

“There are so many ways to cut back on water usage that might not seem significant, but over time they can amount to big savings,” said Plainview Water District Commissioner Andrew Bader. “No effort is too small to consider as every gallon adds up over time. If you identify an area where you and your family can save water, go for it. The less water we use now, the better shape our aquifer will be for generations to come.”

For Women’s History Month, the Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to honor two members of its management team that play crucial roles in the oversight and management of the District. Commissioner Amanda Field and Business Manager Dina Scott both have important responsibilities in the District’s day-to-day operations and have helped to lead the direction of many of the District’s advances over the past couple of years. 

“It is an honor to serve my community and play an important role in Long Island’s water industry as a female since it has historically been a male-dominated field,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “I am proud of the work that myself and the other amazing women of the Plainview Water District have been able to accomplish over the years and look forward to the continued trend of women entering water-related occupations.” 

Commissioner Amanda Field has served on the board of the PWD since winning her initial election in 2016. As a PWD Commissioner, Field—with her fellow commissioners—has led the District to install state-of-the-art treatment technology to remove 1,4-dioxane, PFOA and PFOS ahead of the state’s extremely untenable timeline. She has also been instrumental in launching the District’s Preserve Plainview campaign that aims to bring awareness and educate the many ways residents can protect the region’s sole-source aquifer. In addition, she has spearheaded several initiatives with the local school districts to provide younger generations with a greater appreciation for their community’s most precious natural resource: water. 

Dina Scott, CPA, joined the District in 2017 to assume the role as Business Manager. Ms. Scott uses her more than 16 years of experience in governmental accounting and auditing to oversee all budgetary and financial operations of the District and provides guidance on all related matters. Prior to joining the District, Dina was a supervisor for the well-respected accounting firm where she specialized in governmental services for local municipalities, including local water providers. She is a licensed Certified Public Accountant and holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting from St. Joseph’s College. 

To learn more about the Plainview Water District, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive District updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org and also follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

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Plainview Water District Commissioner Amanda Field

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Plainview Water District Business Manager Dina Scott, CPA

Plainview Water District Urges Residents to be Responsible With Lawn Chemicals and Fertilizers 

Plainview, NY (March 11, 2021)—As part of its Preserve Plainview initiative, the Plainview Water District would like to remind residents about the impacts that premature and excessive lawn fertilizing has on our environment and water supply. The District implores all residents to be mindful of the Nassau County “Fertilizer Law” that prohibits fertilizing prior to April 1 of each year.

“You can have a green lawn without over-fertilizing or fertilizing too early in the season,” said Plainview Water District Chairman Marc Laykind. “To help protect our sole-source aquifer and other local waterways, we ask residents to adhere to Nassau County’s fertilizer law to help support our efforts of environmental protection.”

In accordance with Nassau County’s “Fertilizer Law,” all fertilizers are prohibited from being applied before April 1, 2021 and after November 15, 2021. Residents should always apply the minimum amount of lawn chemicals to the soil and make sure they are stored properly. Additionally, all fertilizers or other lawn chemicals must be kept in cool and dry locations inside of containers that are not prone to leaks. By following instructions listed on the packaging, homeowners can minimize the amount of fertilizer used while at the same time limiting the impact on the environment.

“Our weather is unpredictable this time of year and our region always seems to get an end-of-March snowstorm or cold snap,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Applying fertilizers on frozen ground, or right before the ground refreezes, will take the fertilizers off your lawn and into our waterways. Save your money and our environment by ensuring you fertilize at the right time.”

Organic fertilizers—such as cotton seed meal, bone meal and manure—are other examples of effective alternatives to typical fertilizers that will benefit the environment. Biodegradable insecticides that break down to harmless substances in 2-to-21 days are also another effective yet safe way to treat your lawn.

“Purchasing the right type of fertilizer is as important as when you apply it to your lawn,” added PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “We want people to remember that the water we drink comes from beneath our feet so the more chemicals and toxins we put on the ground, the more likely they are to leach into our groundwater. Increased nitrogen levels in our groundwater will require advanced and costly treatment systems to ensure our water remains at the highest quality. This is why we urge people to use natural, organic fertilizers over fertilizers packed with harmful chemicals.” 

Plainview, NY (March 2, 2021)—There aren’t many things more important than water, which is why the Plainview Water District Board of Commissioners would like to remind the Plainview-Old Bethpage community the importance of signing-up and/or confirm their contact information with the District. Ensuring that each resident has provided the District with accurate contact information allows residents to receive emergency notifications about their water service should a situation ever arise.

“The District has the systems in place to immediately reach our residents should a water-related issue occur; however, we can only do so if we have our residents’ up-to-date contact information on file.” said PWD Board Chairman Marc Laykind. “There is nothing more important to us than the well-being of our community and having the ability to quickly inform residents in the event of an emergency is a crucial part of the equation.”

The District’s reverse-911 system, provided by SwiftReach Networks, is capable of delivering urgent messages directly to residents via phone, text or email. By having residents submit their most up-to-date contact information, the District’s reverse-911 system will be able to contact residents and business owners with information regarding water-related emergencies. All information is securely stored in District databases and is only used in the case of an emergency.

To ensure a resident is signed up to receive emergency notifications or to confirm their contact information is accurate, please visit www.plainviewwater.org and fill out the appropriate form under the tab for “Resources” and then “Emergency Notification System.”  The contact information received will only be accessed in the aforementioned circumstances and will be kept confidential. Residents can also update or confirm the information on file by calling the District at 516-931-6469.

Plainview Water District Quick to Repair Any Breaks

The Plainview Water District would like to remind residents that water main breaks occur more often during the winter months, but are a completely normal experience for this time of year. Fortunately, the District has a highly trained staff that is capable of quickly addressing these potentially emergency situations to a degree where nearby residents may not even know a break has

“Water main breaks are an unfortunate reality in any area that experiences extreme cold, and Long Island certainly qualifies,” said Marc Laykind, chairman of the Plainview Water District. “The good news is that we in the Plainview Water District have an experienced staff that responds to breaks 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to minimize any potential interruptions to your water supply as much as possible.”  

As the case with all cold-weather climates, water main breaks are an unfortunate reality as they typically occur when there is movement in the soil surrounding the water pipes or a freeze/thawing condition. Water mains are installed below the frost line; however, when the soil shrinks or swells it places pressure on the pipes causing a break. Though the length of time to repair a leak varies from incident to incident depending on its severity and how quickly the leak can be located, PWD employees are trained to repair all types of breaks efficiently, quickly and safely.

“Water main breaks present an opportunity for residents to experience a drop in water pressure or discolored water,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “Luckily, both of these are temporary as our dedicated crews react quickly to each break and do whatever they can to limit potential interruptions to our residents’ water service while the repair is being made.” 

When water service is restored, residents may notice air in their pipes and the water may be discolored. The discoloration is not harmful, but can stain laundry. If you experience discolored water, let the cold water run from a faucet or tub at the closest area to your incoming service line for a few minutes or until it clears. 

“While we have systems in place to learn about main breaks shortly after they occur, there are situations where they are not easily detected,” said PWD Commission Andrew Bader. “Anytime someone suspects there may be a water main break in their neighborhood, they should never hesitate to contact us and report the situation. The quicker we can locate a break, the quicker we can respond to it, and the quicker the issue can be resolved. While most main breaks are not dire emergencies, they can lead to one if left unattended.”

The Plainview Water District asks for residents’ help in reporting potential main breaks. Residents that notice areas of wetness along the curb, bubbling of water in the roadway or unexplainable icy conditions are encouraged to contact the Plainview Water District immediately at 516-931-6469. 

PWD Chairman Marc Laykind re-elected to serve for three more years

Commissioner Andrew Bader elected chairman of the Long Island Water Conference

Commissioner Amanda Field elected president of the Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association

Plainview, NY (January 19, 2021)—The Plainview Water District (PWD) is proud to announce that all three of its commissioners have recently won important elections throughout Long Island’s water industry. Chairman Marc Laykind won his re-election bid to continue serving on the Plainview Water District’s board of commissioners. Additionally, Commissioner Andrew Bader was elected to serve as the chairman of the Long Island Water Conference (LIWC) and Commissioner Amanda Field was elected to serve as the president of the Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association (NSWCA). All three of Plainview’s commissioners now hold leadership roles within Long Island’s water industry.

Commissioner Laykind now enters his 3rd term as a PWD Commissioner. He has been a part of the Plainview-Old Bethpage (POB) community for over 27 years and, as Chairman, he is committed to ensuring that our public water supply is of the highest quality and affordable for residents. Laykind is an active member of the Long Island Water Conference and Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association. In addition to his water district responsibilities, Laykind is a practicing attorney.

“I personally want to thank all of the Plainview-Old Bethpage residents who continue to put their trust in me to oversee our most precious natural resource,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “I’d also like to congratulate my fellow commissioners, Andrew Bader and Amanda Field, for their appointments to chair the these two highly respected organizations that advance water causes for all Long Islanders. This is big for our District as it not only speaks to the work that we have collectively been able to accomplish here in Plainview, but the impact it has had on Long Island’s water industry as a whole.”

Andrew Bader has proudly served the POB community as Commissioner of the water district since 2010. Mr. Bader has worked tirelessly in his tenure to ensure Plainview residents are served the highest quality water possible while also helping to push for greater conservation measures to preserve this important natural resource for future generations. Commissioner Bader is also the former president of the Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association and a member of the American Water Works Association. By day, Mr. Bader a Vice President at Mercury Tax Service, Inc.

“In addition to my responsibilities as a Plainview Water District commissioner, I am truly honored to hold this leadership role at the Long Island Water Conference and continue to advance the needs of our industry for the betterment of our communities and all the residents of Long Island,” said Commissioner Andrew Bader. “We will continue to work very hard this year and beyond to make sure that all Long Islanders continue to receive the highest quality water.”

Commissioner Amanda Field has served on the board of the PWD since winning her initial election in 2016. As a PWD Commissioner, Field has led several initiatives with the local school districts to provide younger generations with a greater appreciation for their community’s most precious natural resource: water. These efforts have led to a more robust list of opportunities for students of all ages to learn about the operations of the PWD and their water supply. Commissioner Field is also recognized for her leadership role in implementing the District’s Preserve Plainview campaign that aims to bring awareness and educate the many ways residents can protect our region’s sole-source aquifer. During her tenure with both the LIWC and NSWCA, Commissioner Field has worked to educate area elected officials on the issues surrounding the water industry and was instrumental in successfully fighting for the availability of grant funding for new treatment facilities.

“I appreciate the support of my colleagues in the water industry and the confidence they have placed in me to lead the NSWCA for the next year,” said Commissioner Amanda Field. “As president, I will bring the same energy and apply my experiences as a commissioner in Plainview to advocate for the issues impacting all commissioner-run water district’s throughout Long Island including initiatives to improve water quality and access to funding for treatment projects.”

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive District updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org and also follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

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Caption: (L-R) – PWD Commissioners Marc Laykind, Amanda Field and Andrew Bader. 

As the Plainview community prepares for snow in the forecast as we jump into the colder months, the Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind its residents about the importance of keeping fire hydrants clear. Ensuring hydrants remain free of snow and any other winter debris can save first responders valuable time during their response to an emergency situation.

“The winter weather arriving always provides us with an opportunity to remind our residents and local business owners of the importance of keeping hydrants clear,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Making sure the fire department has quick and easy access to fire hydrants at all times saves precious moments that should be used to responding to an emergency.”

Residents can “adopt” a nearby fire hydrant to pledge responsibility for reporting issues and making sure it kept clear during snowstorms. Clearing approximately three feet around the hydrant will provide both firefighters with uninterrupted access in case of a potential emergency. This provides plenty of room for the emergency personnel to operate the device as well as locate it.

“You never know when or where an emergency is going to occur so never assume that they fire hydrant in front of your home won’t be needed,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “We also encourage residents to never assume someone else will clear the hydrant so please communicate with your neighbors to ensure it is cleared in a timely fashion.”

In addition, the Plainview Water District asks residents to also consider assisting neighbors, family members and friends who are unable to clear their own fire hydrants without assistance. Residents who leave their homes for the winter season are asked to notify a neighbor who can make sure someone is responsible for clearing it in their absence.

“The safety of our community is always our foremost priority, which is why we are so emphatic about making sure this simple yet vital step is not overlooked,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “We appreciate the attention of our residents on this simple, yet crucial, task.”

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org. Follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

The cold winter months are upon us and the Plainview Water District would like to provide residents with some helpful tips to prepare their homes’ water system. When exposed to cold weather, water systems that are not properly prepared or winterized can be subject to breaks and/or leaks. Residents are encouraged to utilize these tips to protect their homes from any damage or disruptions caused by frozen pipes.

“Preparing your home’s water system for the colder weather is very simple, but failing to take these steps can cause problems down the road,” said Chairman Marc Laykind. “We ask everyone in the District to use this information as a guide to avoid a big and unnecessary frustration that frozen pipes can cause.”

Outdoor Water Systems:

Don’t forget to turn off those hose spigots from inside the house and leave the outside valves open to prevent freezing. This allows any trapped water to expand in freezing temperatures, preventing the pipe from bursting. Disconnect and drain all hoses and keep in a warm, dry place for reuse in the spring.

Sprinkler Systems:

Sprinkler systems should be winterized to prevent possible leaks and damage to the system. Leaks in sprinkler systems caused by burst pipes can be hard to identify when the systems return back on line, leading to increased water usage and decreased functionality.

Indoor Maintenance:

If a customer’s water service is in the boiler room or basement, check the area for broken windows or drafts. Brisk winds and freezing temperatures can cause pipes and water meters to freeze or break. In preparation, locate the main water shutoff valve in your home in case of an emergency and make sure pipes in unheated areas—like crawl spaces—are properly insulated.

It is also advised that all customers clearly label the main water shutoff valve in their home so they are prepared in the event of a water leak emergency. Shutoff valves are typically located where the water service enters the house through the foundation.

Water Lines Leading to Unheated Structures:

Be sure to shut off and drain service lines leading to any unheated structures until spring to prevent breaks.

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org. Follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

The Plainview Water District would like to clarify some confusion stemming from a recent Plainview-Old Bethpage School District notification concerning POB schools’ internal water samples that tested positive for lead. We routinely sample for lead and copper in the Water District distribution system and all results have shown that levels for lead were non-detectable (if any contaminant exists, it is so low that modern sampling technology cannot detect it) and copper levels are far below the referred action limit.

Since the water being supplied to homes and buildings is essentially free of these contaminants as confirmed by our routine sampling, when a sample taken within a structure/facility shows elevated levels of lead and/or copper, the source of the lead/copper is interior plumbing or fixtures. Lead was a common material used in plumbing systems and fixtures in older buildings. In fact, to a lesser degree, there are still some plumbing fixtures that are manufactured today with a small amount of lead in them, which can result in positive “first draw” samples.

Water providers do not have any jurisdiction of the plumbing systems or fixtures inside of a home, business, or other buildings. However, to help get a better understanding of the presence of lead and copper in the interior plumbing systems and buildings, the District conducts lead and copper sampling in accordance with the EPA’s regulation known as the lead and copper rule. All water districts across the nation conduct lead and copper sampling in accordance with EPA guidelines.

The Health Department limits are set for lead and copper, and District water laboratory results are as follows:

Lead:

  • Health Department maximum allowable Limit= 15 parts per billion (ppb).
  • Plainview Water District results have been less than 1.0 ppb or non-detectable.

Copper:

  • Health Department maximum allowable Limit= 1.3 parts per million (ppm).
  • Plainview Water District results have shown a maximum level of 0.0044 ppm.

Please be advised that due to the rising number of COVID-19 cases, the Plainview Water District has temporarily suspended all non-emergency in-home water service calls.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the District at 516-931-6469.

Even with widespread power outages caused by Tropical Storm Isaias, the water in Plainview never stopped flowing

Plainview, N.Y. (September 15, 2020)—The impacts of our region’s hurricane season varies from year to year, but with the impacts already experienced by Tropical Storm Isaias, the Plainview Water District is prepared for any extreme weather event allowing the community to experience zero water service interruptions. Due to the District’s planning and extensive precautionary measures, the community’s drinking water remains protected and never stops flowing, even with widespread and lengthy periods of time without power.

“The District has taken many short-term and long-term planning measures over the past several years that have prepared us to handle any severe weather event,” said Board Chairman Marc Laykind. “We realize that the last thing our residents need in a severe weather event is for their water to stop running. This is why we have taken every proactive action necessary to ensure our community always has access to high-quality drinking water.”

In the event of a power outage, the Plainview Water District has its own emergency electrical generator facilities, which are consistently maintained and always on standby to keep water flowing in case of a severe weather event. These generators keep pumps and treatment facilities online without interruption during a severe weather event. In addition, District staff members are well trained to utilize all emergency equipment as well as handle a diverse list of emergency situations, including the recent tropical storm.

“In the case of any severe weather event, our facilities and staff are prepared to act swiftly around the clock,” added Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Our response plan, which includes the mobilization of emergency response teams, water testing laboratories and water main repair contractors, are always on standby so they can be implemented within a moment’s notice.”

The District is also a member of New York’s statewide Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network (NYWARN) of utilities that supports and promotes statewide emergency preparedness, disaster response and mutual aid for public and private water and wastewater utilities. As a member of NYWARN, neighboring water suppliers from across the state provide emergency assistance when necessary.

“Even though our systems rely on electricity to operate, we do not put all of our eggs in the power company’s basket,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “When needed, like in event where power outages are widespread throughout the region, we can be completely self-sufficient. This is the type of service our residents have come to expect, and frankly, the type of service they deserve.”

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469 email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

Plainview Water District personnel will be conducting preventative maintenance operations on all hydrants district-wide from May 6th to approximately July 1st. This routine annual maintenance of our hydrants helps protect our community’s health and safety. This is not an extensive flushing operation. We will be pressure testing our hydrants and opening them briefly to ensure proper operation and readiness so that they will be fully functional by fire crews if needed.

When maintenance is being performed residents in the immediate vicinity of the work may experience temporary discoloration of their water. This discoloration primarily consists of harmless rust particles and does not affect the safety of the water. If you experience discoloration in your water after crews have been testing hydrants in your neighborhood, it is best to run your cold water tap at the lowest point of your home for 2 minutes or until it clears up.

Questions about hydrant testing can be directed to our customer service representatives by calling 516-931-6469 between the hours of 8am and 4pm Monday – Friday.

Dear Long Island residents,

Foremost, we hope that everyone is staying safe and abiding by all health recommendations from the World Health Organization and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. While this COVID-19 outbreak has changed much of our daily lives, it will not hinder our unbreakable spirit to better serve the communities we love.

Responsible for delivering high-quality drinking water to more than 3.5 million residents in Nassau and Suffolk Counties, the membership of both the Long Island Water Conference (LIWC) and Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association (NSWCA) reassures every Long Islander that your drinking water is and will remain unaffected by the COVID-19 outbreak. There is no need to be stocking up and hoarding bottled water.

Aside from standard treatment measures that would inactivate the virus (there are no known COVID-19 detections in any water source throughout the globe), our organizations have worked in lockstep with one another to quickly put in place necessary precautions to promote the health and safety of our residents and employees. Water providers across Long Island implemented temporary policies that closed public facing facilities and restricted the entry of employees to a resident’s home for anything other than an absolute emergency. We rearranged work schedules to better promote social distancing and have isolated key water plant operators to the greatest extent possible. The communication within our industry has been constant since the start of the outbreak to ensure that every water supplier has the personnel, equipment and supplies to see them through this situation now and into the future.

Like doctors, nurses, EMS personnel, police officers and firefighters, employees of water providers are essential and we do not have the luxury of staying away from the field. Regardless of the situation, well pumps and treatment facilities need to be checked daily, water samples from the distribution systems are routinely gathered to ensure quality and water main breaks must be fixed expeditiously to minimize service impacts. Regardless of what stops in the world around us, we must continue marching as every single person relies on us completing our daily tasks.

To the men and women of the water industry who continue to show up regardless of the situation and provide Long Islanders the stability of an uninterrupted supply of water in these uncertain times, thank you. Your efforts, professionalism and dedication to the invaluable roll you play in our society is very much appreciated. Time and time again you have proven that there is no situation or emergency we aren’t prepared to handle.

Sincerely,

Richard Passariello, Chairman, Long Island Water Conference

William Schuckmann, Chairman, Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association

Out of an abundance of caution and in the spirit of protecting public health, effective immediately the Plainview Water District will not be accepting payments inside of the District office in any form. Additionally, the office will be closed to the public until further notice.

Please be advised the payment drop box immediately outside of the entry door is available for you to remit payment. We encourage you to utilize other methods of payment such as postal mail, online payments, or enrolling in automatic bill payments.

Please feel free to contact us at 516-931-6469 if you have any questions.

We thank you for your understanding and cooperation.

As Seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – January 29 – February 4, 2020

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – January 22 – 28, 2020

As Seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – January 15 – 21, 2020

Several talented students at the Plainview-Old Bethpage High School created this video explaining the journey of a drop of water. Watch the video!

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – December 11 – 17, 2019

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – November 27 – December 3, 2019

As seen in the Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald November 20 – 26, 2019

As seen in the Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald – November 6 – 12, 2019

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is requesting a $25.8 million bond to fund infrastructure projects for the treatment of 1,4-dioxane. The bond hearing is being held at the Town of Oyster Bay town hall Tuesday 11/19 at 10am.

The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) is expected to regulate 1,4-dioxane in the near future. The PWD has been planning for treatment ahead of regulations. The Drinking Water Council, appointed by the Governor Cuomo, recommended a maximum level of 1 part-per-billion for 1,4-dioxane and the NYSDOH Commissioner accepted those recommendations. Since this is a new treatment process, pilot studies are required by State and Local Health Departments at each individual water plant site and the District has completed four such pilots at water plants in recent months.  The District agrees with the need for treatment and the District has urged NYSDOH for the time needed to build effective treatment. The District is also involved in litigation to hold polluters responsible for costs incurred for these projects.

This $25.8 million dollar bond is necessary now to provide the PWD with funding that will enable us continue to deliver the highest quality of water to all of our customers.

  • Saturday October 19th 10:00am to 1:00pm

As seen in the Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald August 14 – 20, 2019

As seen in the Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald August 7 – 13, 2019

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald July 24 – July 30, 2019

As Seen in the Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald June 26 – July 2, 2019

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – May 22 – 28, 2019

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – May 15 – 21, 2019

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – May 1 – 7, 2019

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – April 24 – 30, 2019

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – April 17 – 23, 2019

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald April 17 – 23, 2019

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald March 13 – 19, 2019

In an effort to conserve water and improve the resiliency of our infrastructure, the District is working with a professional leak detection company. This work is being done overnight from the hours of 9pm to 4am for the next few weeks. These experts will be listening for any leaks coming from the water mains out in the roadway. This specialized task is best done in the overnight hours when water demand is at the lowest and irrigation systems are shutoff. Should you see a truck in your neighborhood that reads Leak Detection, please know that they are working for the District.

 

As seen in The Plainview Old – Bethpage Herald January 30 – February 5, 2019

Plainview Water District receives $373,000.00 Grant for essential infrastructure upgrades

As seen in The Plainview Old – Bethpage Herald January 23 – 29

1,4 – Dioxane Update

As seen in The Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald January 16 – 22, 2019

Plainview Water District collects Toys and Coats for charitable organizations

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald January 9 – 15, 2019

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald November 14 – 20, 2018

More than 200 pounds of unused drugs were properly disposed of during this event to help maintain the quality of water for our customers.

As seen in Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald November 7 – 13, 2018

Thank you to all who attended our 90th Anniversary celebration at the Plainview Library on October 3rd. It was a memorable evening as we were joined by many members of the Plainview Old Bethpage community, as well as a number of our local elected officials.

Many historical photos and documentation from the District are currently on display at the library through October 14th. The Plainview Library is located at 999 Old Country Road, Plainview.

Click on the photo below to view gallery from the October 3rd event.

 

As seen in Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald September 26 – October 2, 2018

As seen in Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald August 8 – 14, 2018

As seen in Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald August 1 – 7, 2018

As seen in Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald June 27 – July 3, 2018

As seen in Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald June 20 – 26, 2018

As seen in Plainview-Old Bethpage Herald May 16 – 22, 2018