Proactive Approach to Treating for PFOS and PFOA has Favorably Positioned District and the Community

On April 10, 2024, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a series of new regulations setting national maximum contaminant levels (MCL) for several perfluorinated compounds. While water providers throughout the country have up to five years to comply with the new standards, the Plainview Water District (PWD) is proud to announce that it is currently in compliance with the regulations.

“Our residents can rest assured that the water they use each and every day is currently compliant with these standards, which are stricter than the ones New York State imposed in 2020,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Our proactive and aggressive response to construct Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) treatment at impacted well sites for the purpose of removing perfluorinated compounds has ensured the water delivered to our customers is of the highest quality.”

The EPA’s new water quality standards established a nation-wide MCL for PFOA and PFOS at four parts per trillion (PPT)—the state’s current MCL for these contaminants is 10 PPT. The new regulation also establishes MCLs for other perfluorinated compounds that include PFHxS (Perfluorohexanesulfonic acid), PFNA (Perfluorononanoic acid) and HFPO-DA (Hexafluoropropylene dimer acid) at 10 PPT. Water suppliers throughout the country have three years to sample for these contaminants and an additional two years after that to implement treatment. Full compliance with the regulation is required by 2029.

“Not only have we been testing for these specific and other currently unregulated perfluorinated contaminants since 2018, we have had effective treatment for them in place before the summer of 2020,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “The treatment systems that were built in response to the 2020 regulations by New York State are effective at removing these compounds down to levels of non-detect.”

“The level of investment made by this District and the speed in which the investment was made speaks volumes to the ability and expertise of the impressive team that has been assembled,” said PWD Commission Michael Chad. “Luck was never a part of the equation here. We are only in this positive position because of the hard work and dedication of this board, our staff and engineers.”

To learn more about the projects the PWD has completed and is currently embarking on to provide residents in the POB community with high-quality water, please visit https://plainviewwater.org/about/plainview-water-district-projects/. If residents have questions about these projects or the quality of their water, they are encouraged to visit the District’s website, www.plainviewwater.org, email info@plainviewwater.org or call 516-931-6469.

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Planview Water District Informs Residents on Maintenance to the Community’s Elevated Water Tower and its Importance

The Plainview Water District’s elevated water tower is a prominent landmark in Plainview-Old Bethpage, and plays a vital role in the delivery of water to both residential and commercial entities within the community on a daily basis. Recently, crews’ pressure-washed the 143-foot, 1.25-million-gallon water tower as part of PWD’s recurring maintenance program. Beyond the aesthetic upkeep, this important maintenance exercise serves to maintain the integrity of the tower and preserve the life of the paint and protective coatings by mitigating any accumulation of natural biological growth.

“The Plainview Water District’s elevated water tower is not only a visual staple within the Planview-Old Bethpage community, but is a vital component of our water infrastructure,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “The tower provides both water storage and system pressure so, it must be maintained appropriately. The District has strict timelines when it comes to proper inspections and upkeep to ensure it is always ready to serve.”

Water towers are a tried-and-true method for ensuring that pressure throughout a water distribution system is consistent. Using gravity, the weight of more than one million gallons of water stored more than 100 feet in the air helps to pressurize a significant portion of the District’s nine-square-mile service territory. This system ensures homes continue to receive pressurized water even in the event of an emergency, such as a fire or water main break. During the summer months, when water usage is at its peak, it is important for residents to practice better water conservation habits to ensure tank levels remain adequate so there is ample water storage and pressure in the event of a fire emergency.

“In the event of an emergency, we want to ensure that we are prepared in every way possible,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Continuing best practices in relation to water consumption contributes significantly to the overall health of our infrastructure, especially the water tower. These systems are generally much more efficient to operate in comparison to other systems such as ground storage tanks or booster pumping stations.”

Plainview’s water tower is given a thorough inspection by the District’s engineers twice per year. During this inspection, a detailed report of the tanks condition is produced. The reports are then reviewed by the District’s superintendent who is a licensed professional engineer. Any minor issues found during these regular inspections are corrected and recommendations are made for larger capital improvement items, if needed.

Each 2.31 feet of height provides 1.0 pound per square inch (PSI) of pressure. These elevated tanks are typically installed at the highest elevation in the system for this specific reason. The tank’s capacity is designed to provide enough volume to satisfy peak demand conditions during the summer while also having the ability to meet any demand caused by an emergency such as a fire.

“The District has always remained dedicated to our infrastructure as well as the necessary upkeep and any upgrades that may be needed,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “This facility in particular receives routine inspections and any continued needed maintenance throughout the year. With all of our facilities, we remain diligent in our maintenance to make sure that we are providing our residents with the best service and quality possible.”

The Plainview Water District has 6 well sites that collectively house 12 deep groundwater wells with a total approved capacity of 24.5 million gallons per day. The District’s service area is approximately 9 square miles and makes up Plainview, Old-Bethpage and portions of Syosset and Woodbury. Typically, the District pumps approximately 1.7 billion gallons per year from the groundwater aquifer. While the allowable capacity exceeds a typical max day seasonal pumpage of 10 million gallons per day, the District must be prepared to meet fire demands, extreme weather and ability to supply water in case of equipment failures.

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469, email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. To receive regular updates from the Plainview Water District, please sign up for email updates on the District’s homepage. Don’t forget to stay connected to the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PlainviewWaterDistrict

Plainview Water District is Dedicated to Offering the POB Community Important Water and Cost-Saving Advice

With warmer weather on the horizon, the Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind residents and local businesses of the importance of water conservation and the simple steps to follow to do so. Water usage throughout the POB community nearly triples during the spring and summer, primarily due to irrigation systems. Conservation efforts won’t just save money and cut down on unnecessary water wastage, but they will also notably alleviate stress on our infrastructure and help protect our sole-source aquifer.

“Each year, with the onset of spring and summer, there is a noticeable surge in water demand within the Plainview-Old Bethpage community,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “With the reactivation of irrigation systems and the common occurrence of inefficient lawn watering practices, it is important for us to remind our residents of better practices that will save both water and money. We encourage residents to be attentive and adjust their irrigation controller schedules to better align with current weather conditions and temperatures. By adopting better watering practices, significant amounts of water, potentially tens of thousands of gallons per household, can be conserved and prevented from being needlessly wasted.”

A lawn’s watering needs fluctuate significantly between April and September. Merely programming an irrigation clock in April and deactivating it when the season concludes in the Fall may result in significant water waste. Installing a smart irrigation controller is the best way to remove the guesswork and burden of remembering to alter watering schedules. Smart controllers use a Wi-Fi connection to tap into local weather stations to automatically adjust watering schedules based on past, present and future weather conditions. To enhance water management, consider installing a rain sensor in your irrigation system to prevent sprinklers from activating during or after rainfall events.

“Irrigation practices are often misinterpreted, with many believing that our lawns need a significant amount of water in the warmer months,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “In reality, to keep a lawn healthy, only about an inch of water per week is necessary. Overwatering encourages shallow roots, increasing the risk of grass burning on hot days.”

The Plainview Old-Bethpage community can do their part by also being mindful of Nassau County’s Lawn Watering Ordinances, which dictate when homeowners can and cannot water their lawns. The ordinance stipulates that even-numbered homes and non-numbered homes can only water on even-numbered days, odd-numbered homes can only water on odd-numbered days, and no lawn watering can be done between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on any day. 

In addition, residents can also consider turning back the amount of time each zone in their irrigation system waters. Removing just a few minutes of watering from each zone will have a significant impact on water usage, which will ultimately be reflected in the residents’ bills. 

“By simply following best irrigation practices and utilizing available technology, the POB community can be champions in water conservation,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “Yes, it does require a modest upfront investment to convert to a smart controller or other similar water-saving equipment, but the amount saved in your water bill will more than pay for the upfront costs in a relatively short period of time.”

For additional information on water-saving tips and best practices throughout the irrigation season, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Be sure to sign-up for email updates on the District’s homepage to receive additional information about water district activities. 

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As featured in the Nassau Observer on March 20, 2024

PWD Encourages Residents to Use Lawn Chemicals and Fertilizers Responsibly by Applying Them After April 1st.

As part of the Preserve Plainview initiative, the Plainview Water District aims to highlight the environmental and water supply repercussions associated with premature and excessive lawn fertilization. The District implores all residents to be mindful of the Nassau County “Fertilizer Law” that prohibits fertilizing prior to April 1 of each year.

“The Plainview Water District hopes residents are able to enjoy their green lawns and landscapes this spring, while being mindful of the regulations in place by our County to ensure we are protecting our only source of water,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “To safeguard our sole-source aquifer and local waterways, we urge residents to follow Nassau County’s fertilizer regulations. This small act significantly aids our initiatives to enhance groundwater quality and preserve our environment.”

In accordance with Nassau County’s “Fertilizer Law,” all fertilizers are prohibited from being applied before April 1, 2024 and after November 15, 2024. Residents should always apply the minimum amount of lawn chemicals to the soil and make sure they are stored properly. Additionally, all fertilizers or other lawn chemicals must be kept in cool and dry locations inside of containers that are not prone to leaks. By following instructions listed on the packaging, homeowners can minimize the amount of fertilizer used, limit the amount that runs off into the ground and into our sewer systems so the impact to the environment can be kept to a minimum.

“With the sporadic weather during the transition of seasons, it’s crucial to avoid using these fertilizers until the time is appropriate,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Applying fertilizers just before the ground thaws causes fertilizer to be washed off your lawn, where they can then enter our waterways. We kindly ask residents to be mindful of the correct timing for using these chemicals, as it not only benefits the environment but also saves you money.”

Organic fertilizers—such as cotton seed meal, bone meal and manure—are other examples of effective alternatives to typical fertilizers that can benefit the environment. Biodegradable insecticides that break down to harmless substances in 2-to-21 days are also another effective yet safe way to treat your lawn, while protecting the aquifer.

“The more chemicals and toxins we apply on the ground and in our lawns, the greater the likelihood of them seeping into the groundwater,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “This reality makes selecting the appropriate fertilizer type equally as important as the timing of when it can be applied to your lawn. Higher nitrogen levels in our groundwater requires treatment to prevent these elevated levels from affecting our drinking water. The District encourages residents to pay attention to the types of fertilizers they are purchasing and opt for a natural or organic option whenever possible.”

For additional information on the proper use of lawn and garden products, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Be sure to sign-up for email updates on the District’s homepage to receive additional information about water district activities.

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Don’t Let Winter Cause POB Hydrants to Hibernate!

As winter settles in, colder temperatures are here to stay as is the likelihood for a winter storm. The Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind residents about the importance of keeping fire hydrants around the Plainview-Old Bethpage community free of snow and other winter debris. By doing so, members of the POB community can assist first responders in emergency situations, and valuable time can be saved.

“As the colder temperatures set in, it’s essential to remind our residents and business owners about the importance of maintaining clear hydrants throughout the community this winter,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Ensuring fire hydrants are kept clear at all times is crucial to ensure that the fire department can gain immediate access in the event of an emergency. It’s a quick and simple task that we can all do to assist emergency services in a meaningful way.”

Residents are encouraged to “adopt” a nearby hydrant so there is a dedicated person in the neighborhood responsible in keeping it clear during a snowstorm as well as reporting any potential issues. Clearing a three-foot radius around the hydrant will allow firefighters to not only identify their locations with ease, but also provide uninterrupted access during a potential emergency.

“The availability of fire hydrants at all times is essential in emergency situations,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “During an emergency, every moment can be critical, and we cannot predict when or where a fire hydrant might be needed. As a community, it is our job to take precautions and to help our neighbors—this is a simple way to do just that.”

The District is also asking its residents to consider providing assistance to any friends, family members, or neighbors who are not able to clear their own hydrants. Those who leave their homes for the winter season are asked to please notify a neighbor who can ensure a hydrant is still cleared in their absence.

“We encourage residents to be aware of where the nearest fire hydrant to your home is and take part in adopting a hydrant this winter,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “The District remains committed to the well-being of the POB community, and we will continue to raise awareness of initiatives that can benefit residents and emergency services. We thank those who have contributed their time to this worthy cause this winter.”

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org. Follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

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PWD Staff is Geared up and Ready to Tackle Any Pesky Breaks

With the winter season in full swing, the Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to once again remind residents that water main breaks are common across the region throughout the season. Nevertheless, residents and businesses should not worry as the District’s skilled staff is well-prepared and equipped to respond promptly to any emergency. Despite a several water main breaks occurring within the District this winter, service was efficiently restored to the affected areas in a timely manner. The PWD team is highly capable of addressing potential emergency situations rapidly, even in cases where nearby residents may not be aware of a water main break.

“It’s unfortunate, but it’s an unpredictable consequence of the climate in our region,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “Given the freezing and thawing cycles we experience this time of year, it’s inevitable that some main breaks will occur. However, the PWD staff is well-versed in addressing these issues, having the necessary experience, equipment, and preparedness to respond promptly, working around the clock to resolve any such issues.”

As the case with all cold-weather climates, water main breaks are an unfortunate reality as they typically occur when there is movement in the soil surrounding the water pipes or a freeze/thawing condition. Water mains are installed below the frost line; however, when the soil shrinks or swells it places pressure on the pipes causing a break. Though the length of time to repair a leak varies from incident to incident depending on its severity and how quickly the leak can be located, PWD employees are trained to repair all types of breaks efficiently, quickly and safely.

“The District’s response plan helps to ensure residents experience minimal interruptions to their water service when breaks occur,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “We ask that if residents suspect a water main break or any water-related problem in your home or area, please do not hesitate to contact PWD and report the situation. By reporting any suspected or undetected breaks or issues, the District can take necessary measures to prevent service disruption or mitigate potentially severe leaks.”

When water service is restored, residents may notice air in their pipes and the water may be discolored. The discoloration is not harmful, but can stain laundry. If you experience discolored water, let the cold water run from a faucet or tub at the closest area to your incoming service line for a few minutes or until it clears.

“When a water main break occurs, some residents or businesses may experience discolored water or a decrease in water pressure,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “Following a main break, residents are encouraged to monitor their water and contact the District with any questions they may have. PWD wants to ensure that the POB community is aware that we are always here to assist with any water-related issues or questions that may ever arise.”

The Plainview Water District asks for residents’ help in reporting potential main breaks. Residents that notice areas of wetness along the curb, bubbling of water in the roadway or unexplainable icy conditions are encouraged to contact the Plainview Water District immediately at 516-931-6469.

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive updates by filling out the form at www.plainviewwater.org or by following the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

Water Rate Increase Went into Effect on January 1, 2024

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is committed to providing the Plainview-Old Bethpage community with the highest quality water at the lowest possible cost. The District would like to inform residents and local businesses within its service territory that a modest rate adjustment has been established and went into effect on January 1, 2024. The increase will be used to fund crucial infrastructure improvements and treatment enhancement projects at all of its six water plant sites. In addition to the increased capital needed for treatment projects, the District is also faced with increased operating costs including rising electric costs and electrical demand, treatment chemicals, and laboratory testing and analysis.

“To ensure that the Plainview Water District consistently delivers high-quality water to residents, it is imperative to continue implementing infrastructure projects while also enhancing our facilities,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “We had to introduce minor rate adjustments in 2024 to ensure we have the funds necessary to maintain and operate the District efficiently and effectively. We don’t take raising rates lightly, but were able to keep increases to a minimum due to our team’s significant efforts in securing nearly $35 million—and counting—in state and federal grant funding.”

Specifically, the new revenue will help cover the costs associated with construction, installation and operation of new advanced oxidation process (AOP) and granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment systems to continue treating the community’s drinking water for 1,4-dioxane, PFOA and PFOS. Residents and businesses will receive the first quarter water bill in the month of April 2024, which will be the first bill with the new water rates in effect.

The vast majority of residents will notice a minimal impact on their bills, but this impact could become more significant with higher usage. For the average resident using 30,000 gallons of water per quarter, the new rates will result in an increase of $7.63 per quarter, or $2.54 per month. Minimal users, those using 8,000 gallons of water or less per quarter, will experience an increase of $1.50 per quarter or $0.50 per month. The District encourages all residents to consider adopting water conservation measures this spring and summer, including the installation of a smart irrigation controller, to help lower their bills when water usage reaches its peak.

For more information about the 2024 billing changes, please visit www.plainviewwater.org/billing. For other questions about the District, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

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PWD Chairman Marc Laykind Re-Elected to Serve the District for Three More Years

Commissioner’s New Three-Year Term Began on January 1, 2024

The Plainview Water District is proud to announce that Chairman Marc Laykind has won his re-election bid to continue serving on the District’s Board of Commissioners. The District’s annual Water Commissioner Election was held on Tuesday, December 12, 2023. Chairman Laykind began serving his new three-year term on January 1, 2024.

“I am incredibly honored and humbled to be re-elected as a Commissioner here at the Plainview Water District,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Serving the Plainview-Old Bethpage community is not just a duty but a great privilege. I am proud to have the opportunity to continue our work and mission here at the Plainview Water District for another three years.”

First elected in 2015 and serving as Chairman since 2017, Chairman Laykind has served on the District’s Board of Commissioners overseeing nearly every aspect of PWD’s operations as a Commissioner and Chairman. Laykind is also an attorney in private practice with offices in New York City and Nassau County. He has been an active member in the Plainview-Old Bethpage community for over 30 years, where he resides with his wife, Debbie, and sons, Matthew and Michael.

Chairman Laykind will continue to work alongside current Commissioners Andrew Bader and Michael Chad as well as the PWD’s staff to continue providing quality water and service to the residents of the POB community.

For additional information about the Plainview Water District, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

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The Plainview-Old Bethpage community once again showed its generosity by contributing to the annual toy drive at the Plainview Water District. As it has done in years past, the Plainview Water District partnered with the Toys for Tots Foundation, sponsored by the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. This year, the District hosted a dedicated drive-thru drop-off day to facilitate convenient toy donations. The District headquarters functioned as an official drop-off site for the foundation, successfully collecting more than 150 toys.

“The District is touched and extremely grateful for the level of participation and generosity from the members of this community,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “The Plainview-Old Bethpage residents always do their part to help out and participate in these great events. These contributions are going to make this holiday season more enjoyable for so many people, and that is what this effort and this time of year is all about.”

The U.S. Marine Corps Reserve ‘Toys for Tots’ Foundation is a nonprofit organization that aims to provide all children across the United States with happiness and joy throughout the holiday season. Through the gift of a new toy, disadvantaged children will not be overlooked during the holidays, and will know that a community of people cares for them.

“We appreciate the community’s unwavering support in these endeavors year after year.” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “PWD is delighted to lead and take part in these important initiatives and contribute positively in any way possible. Thanks to the big-hearted POB community, many children will be able to smile this holiday season.”

Since the District started this partnership several years ago, hundreds of toys have been donated from the community to support this cause. The Plainview Water District thanks the Plainview-Old Bethpage community for their generosity and continued support.

“It has been an absolute pleasure to take part in my first Toys for Tot’s Drive at the PWD,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “We are immensely proud to continue to partner with our community that continues to radiate support and compassion. With the POB’s constant support, we have been able to plant seeds of joy for many children that needed it this holiday season.”

For additional information about the Plainview Water District, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

PWD Staff is Equipped to Quickly Respond and Repair Any Breaks

As winter temperatures quickly approach, The Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind residents that water main breaks are common during this time of year. However, residents of PWD can rest assured that the District’s skilled and highly trained staff is well-equipped to respond immediately to any such emergencies. The District’s staff is capable of quickly addressing these potentially emergency situations to a degree where nearby residents may not even know a break has occurred.

“Regions like ours, that experience extremely cold weather, are no stranger to water main breaks,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “The Plainview Water District is proud to have a team of experienced professionals who respond to water breaks 24/7. Our team is dedicated to resolving any water-related issues that may arise, ensuring that residents’ water service is restored promptly.”

As the case with all cold-weather climates, water main breaks are an unfortunate reality as they typically occur when there is movement in the soil surrounding the water pipes or a freeze/thawing condition. Water mains are installed below the frost line; however, when the soil shrinks or swells it places pressure on the pipes causing a break. Though the length of time to repair a leak varies from incident to incident depending on its severity and how quickly the leak can be located, PWD employees are trained to repair all types of breaks efficiently, quickly and safely.

“Although the District has implemented measures to detect main breaks as soon as possible, there are instances where they may go undetected due to various factors,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “If you suspect a water main break or any water-related problem in your home or community, please do not hesitate to contact us to report the situation.”

When water service is restored, residents may notice air in their pipes and the water may be discolored. The discoloration is not harmful, but can stain laundry. If you experience discolored water, let the cold water run from a faucet or tub at the closest area to your incoming service line for a few minutes or until it clears.

“Residents may experience a decrease in water pressure or discolored water due to water main breaks,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “Ensuring minimal interruptions to residents’ water service is of utmost importance at PWD. As such, our staff is committed to responding quickly to any breaks that occur, with dedicated crews assigned to this task around the clock.”

The Plainview Water District asks for residents’ help in reporting potential main breaks. Residents that notice areas of wetness along the curb, bubbling of water in the roadway or unexplainable icy conditions are encouraged to contact the Plainview Water District immediately at 516-931-6469.

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive updates by filling out the form at www.plainviewwater.org or by following the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

As seen in the Mid-Island Times on November 30, 2023

The District Will Collect Toys for Children Now Through December 15th

In an effort to spread holiday spirit throughout the Plainview-Old Bethpage community, the Plainview Water District (PWD) is once again proud to partner with the Toys for Tots Foundation, sponsored by the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. The PWD headquarters, located at 10 Manetto Hill Road, will serve as an official drop-off location for the foundation now through December 15th. The District encourages residents to donate new and unwrapped gifts to help less fortunate children this holiday season. PWD will also be holding a drive-thru drop off day on December 14th.

“With so much going on, it’s easy to get caught up in the chaos and overlook the opportunities we each have to brighten someone’s day this holiday season,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “Even a small contribution can make a significant impact in bringing happiness to children who otherwise might not have a festive season. We highly urge members of the Plainview-Old Bethpage community to join us in playing our role in supporting those in our community who need it most.”

New and unwrapped gift donations can be dropped off at the PWD headquarters anytime until Friday, December 15th. The District will also be holding a drive-thru day on Thursday, December 14th, where community members can drop off toy donations with extra convenience. Since the District started this partnership several years ago, hundreds of toys have been donated from the community to support local children.

“During the holiday season, it is easy to forget about the world around us and those that may not have the resources we do,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “By doing the simple task of taking part in a Toys for Tots drive, we each have the ability to make someone’s holiday special. It is always terrific to see our Plainview-Old Bethpage community join in the efforts and do their part to pay it forward. We appreciate every single person who comes out to participate in this initiative.”

The U.S. Marine Corps Reserve ‘Toys for Tots’ Foundation is a nonprofit organization that aims to provide all children across the United States with happiness and joy throughout the holiday season. Through the gift of a new toy, disadvantaged children will not be overlooked during the holidays, and will know that a community of people cares for them.

“The holidays can be an incredibly stressful time for many of us, but by donating an item or two to these children it will not only make their holiday better but shows the strength and kindness of our community,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “We strongly encourage anyone who has the means or ability this year to stop by and support this wonderful cause by dropping off a toy for someone in need.”

The Plainview Water District thanks the community in advance for their generous contribution, and is looking forward to the holidays.

For additional information about the Plainview Water District, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

Proper Disposal of Expired or Unwanted Medications to Prevent Potential Contamination of Sole-Source Aquifer

(L-R) Nassau County Police Officer Daniel Capellan, PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader, PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind and PWD Commissioner Michael Chad at Pharmaceutical Take Back Day.

The Plainview Water District (PWD), in partnership with the Nassau County Police Department, successfully hosted its sixth annual Pharmaceutical Take Back Day and collected over 400 pounds of unwanted or expired medications. These medications will now be disposed of properly in order to prevent them from making it into the community’s sole-source aquifer for drinking water. This District has now collected and properly disposed of more than 1,800 pounds of medications since it began this annual event six years ago.

“For the past six years, the Plainview Water District has held Pharmaceutical Take Back Day as part of its continued initiative to protect our sole-source aquifer and prevent the improper disposal of medications,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “The District extends its thanks to the POB community for their participation and commitment which has been instrumental in contributing to the event’s success year after year. We look forward to further collaboration with POB residents and service to the community in the future.”

When someone improperly disposes of prescription and over-the-counter medicines, such as flushing them down the toilet or throwing them away in the garbage, there is a likelihood that the medications’ contents will ultimately make their way into the community water ways and water supply. If there is an elevated presence of toxins from pharmaceuticals in the groundwater, the District will have no choice but to invest in expensive treatment systems so the contaminants can be removed before they reach customers’ homes.

“Our annual Pharmaceutical Takeback Day continues to provide a useful service to our residents and allows them to play an important role in protecting our community drinking water source,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “The entire team at the Plainview Water District is incredibly grateful for the continued support and involvement of the community, as this event wouldn’t be possible without them. We are excited to continue to hold this event for many years to come and to watch its success continue to grow with both current and future members of the POB community.”

“As a longtime member of the Plainview-Old Bethpage community, this was an incredible experience to see how many of our community members participate in Pharmaceutical Take Back Day,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “The level of dedication shown by the District to make this event happen and to the residents that participated is truly remarkable and will without a doubt help our efforts to preserve Plainview. Thank you to all who took the time to join us and participate!”

For additional information about the Plainview Water District, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

District Once Again Provides Community with Convenient, Drive-Thru Opportunity to Safely Dispose Unwanted Medications

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is hosting its sixth annual Pharmaceutical Take Back Day on Saturday, October 28 between 10:00 am and 1:00 pm at 10 Manetto Hill Road. Residents are encouraged to stop by the District Headquarters to safely and properly dispose of any unwanted or expired medications. As a part of the PWD’s Preserve Plainview initiative, this annual drive-thru event ensures the proper disposal of pharmaceuticals and prevents them from making their way into the aquifer which is our community’s sole-source of drinking water.

“The Plainview Water District highly encourages the Plainview-Old Bethpage community to join us in participating in this year’s Pharmaceutical Take Back Day event—to dispose of their expired or unused medications in a safe and convenient way,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “We have a collective duty as a community to make all efforts possible to protect our shared environment and drinking water. This event is a quick and easy act that has a significant and long-lasting impact on our environment and sustainability. Year after year, POB residents continue to impress us with their active involvement in this event and we are looking forward to making this year’s the most successful one yet.” 

Normally, if someone flushes medications down the toilet or throws them in the garbage, there is a likelihood that the medications’ contents will ultimately make their way into the community water ways and water supply. If there is an elevated presence of toxins from pharmaceuticals in the groundwater, the District will have no choice but to invest in expensive treatment systems to remove any contaminants before they reach customers’ homes.

“Taking part in Pharmaceutical Take Back Day is an opportunity to responsibly dispose of any unused medications, while playing an active role in safeguarding our community and environment,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Each of us, as members of the POB community, have a responsibility to do all that we can to protect our environment from any potentially harmful substances and reducing our environmental impact. We hope to be joined by many residents who are looking to take action and aid in protecting current and future generations of our community.” 

This year, Pharmaceutical Take Back Day, which is held in partnership with the Nassau County Police Department, will take place on October 28th from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm. All residents with unused or expired medications are encouraged to drop them off at the District’s headquarters—10 Manetto Hill Road—and may do so anonymously without having to leave their vehicles.  

“The District has continued to host this significantly effective event for the past six years, largely in part of the outpouring support and participation from the Plainview-Old Bethpage community,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “I am extremely excited to be a part of this year’s Pharmaceutical Take Back Day and to see the POB community’s support first-hand. By participating, residents are directly making a positive impact on public health and caring for our shared environment.”

For additional information about the Plainview Water District’s Pharmaceutical Take Back Day or other District initiatives, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives. 

Planview Water District Shares the Many Reasons for and Benefits of Waterflow-Sensing Technology

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is encouraging residents to take advantage of new technologies that provide real-time access to the amount of water flowing within their home. This announcement comes as the District has been alerted to several instances over the past couple of months of residents leaving their homes for an extended period of time and returning to significant flood damage. The new technologies available not only enable users to establish leak alerts, but also provides them with real-time access to their homes’ water usage.

“We are always saddened to hear stories from residents who return to a flooded home due to a broken pipe or valve that didn’t hold while they were away,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “While many of these situations cannot be avoided, the damage caused by them can be significantly mitigated by installing a water flow sensor. These devices are relatively simple to install and provide residents with the power to see the amount of water flowing through their meter at any given time.”

Smart water flow devices are typically installed on the main water line to accurately measure and communicate water usage within a home or business. Some devices can shut off the water main if a significant leak is detected. Tracking and monitoring water consumption offers many positive benefits to consumers, as the data collected by the flow sensors can keep track of usage patterns, ensuring accurate billing, and even help detect leaks before they become a major source of damage. Many of these devices come with an app that can be downloaded onto a phone or tablet that offers a user-friendly dashboard to display data.

“With all of the new technology out there, we want to ensure that residents are aware of the many new tools available to make their lives easier and keep them informed,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “These products can be very useful investments, paying for themselves relatively quickly, as they can assist residents with tracking water usage in a convenient manner. It can also help in better understanding your water bill and how you can practice better consumption habits to bring the cost on your bill down even more.”

Leaks can be one of the largest sources of damage to your home, while also generating significant water bills. While most homes have either a three quarter to one inch service line, the amount of flow coming out of a quarter-inch pipe can be staggering. A quarter-inch pipe flowing with water can pump out approximately 15,000 gallons of water every day—nearly a half million gallons of water per month. Some of these smart devices offer floor sensors that pair with the device to monitor further for flooding. With smart flow technology, users can remain aware of what is occurring in their households at all times and safeguard their property to possible leak-related incidents all from the convenience of their smartphone.

“The District always wants our residents and their homes to remain safe,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “This kind of technology can allow homeowners to travel or be away from their property, while alleviating the worry of an undetected leak occurring while they are not home. We highly encourage any residents that travels for extended periods of time or have unoccupied properties to consider investing in these devices an provide some additional peace of mind to their lives.”

For more information about these devices residents are encouraged to research smart water flow devices and choose a product that properly meets their expectations and needs.

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469, email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. To receive regular updates from the Plainview Water District, please sign up for email updates on the District’s homepage. Don’t forget to stay connected to the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PlainviewWaterDistrict

As seen in the Mid-Island Times 8.3.23

New Treatment System Specifically Designed to Remove 1,4-Dioxane, PFOA & PFOS

Plainview Water District Board of Commissioners and staff
at Plant 2 Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

The Plainview Water District (PWD) recently held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to unveil the newly completed, state-of-the-art treatment facility that was specifically designed to remove emerging contaminants 1,4-dioxane, PFOA and PFOS from the community’s drinking water. Plant No. 2, located on Donna Drive, represents a $4.2 million investment into the community’s drinking water infrastructure that is capable of producing up to two million gallons of high-quality drinking water each and every day. The Plainview Water District is viewed as a leader in water treatment and has successfully put more Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) systems in place than any other water supplier on Long Island. 


“This ceremony marks yet another major milestone for the Plainview Water District and our mission to continue delivering high-quality water to the POB community,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “This facility was operational in record time, well before the new water quality regulations went into effect, and that was only made possible by the dedication of the hard work by our staff and engineering team. With its permanent, year-round capabilities, this facility will bolster our ability to continue providing water that meets and exceeds all water quality standards.”

The facility was initially designed to repurpose treatment equipment previously purchased to complete the temporary treatment system installed in 2020. In August 2020, the New York State Health Department finalized regulations establishing maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for emerging compounds 1,4-dioxane, PFOA and PFOS. Construction began in November 2021 to redevelop the temporary treatment plant into a year-round facility to treat for these contaminants. This ensured the District remained ahead of the regulatory timelines for emerging contaminants established by the New York State Department of Health, without the need for an extension to remain in compliance.

“This plant was strategically transformed from a temporary facility to a permanent facility to create a long-standing plant that will produce billions of gallons of the highest-quality drinking water over the next couple of decades,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “By continuing to invest in our infrastructure, we are investing in our community for generations to come. The District has put in tremendous effort and resources to create this facility and being able to see the astonishing outcome has truly been remarkable.”

The treatment technology required to remove 1,4-dioxane is called the Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP). This treatment system works by adding a small amount of an oxidant into the water—in this case hydrogen peroxide—that passes through an ultraviolet light reactor destroying the 1,4-dioxane molecules. From there, the water then travels through Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) filtration—industrial-sized carbon filters—so any remaining detections of the oxidant as well as other volatile organic compounds can be removed before water goes through the rest of the treatment and delivery process. This treatment duo, which is also effective at removing PFOA and PFOS, is the only method approved by state and local health departments to remove 1,4-dioxane.

“It was a noteworthy experience to be able to take part in the celebrations for this facility, particularly after getting to witness the PWD’s staff and engineer’s great efforts over the past seven months,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “Seeing just part of the hard-work and time that went into the creation and execution of this project was remarkable. We thank all those who had a hand in developing this great facility for our community.”

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469 email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

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(L-R) Plainview Water District Commissioners Andrew Bader, Marc Laykind and Michael Chad at Plant 2.

As seen in the Mid-Island Times on July 14, 2023

Water District Offers Best Practices and Tips to Help Lower Third Quarter Bills

Plainview, N.Y.—The Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind residents that July is Smart Irrigation Month! This time of the year is a great reminder of the benefits of smart controllers and their ability to reduce water consumed by irrigation systems by up to 30 percent. With the warm and dry summer weather, District-wide water pumpage numbers are up significantly due to the high use of irrigation systems. As part of its Preserve Plainview initiative, the District would like to provide residents with ways to save water around their homes and businesses.

“Every summer, the District sees increased water usage that is almost exclusively attributed to irrigation systems,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “We highly encourage all residents and businesses throughout the District to prioritize conservation efforts and implement best practices into their daily routines. In doing so, we are making a great impact on the protection of our water source and not overburdening our infrastructure.”

Water consumption in the Plainview-Old Bethpage community nearly triples during the summer months. Water conservation will not only reduce unnecessary water waste and save residents money, but will significantly decrease excess pumpage of the aquifer and stresses to the District’s groundwater wells and treatment systems.

The Plainview Water District strongly recommends consideration of swapping your standard automatic irrigation timer with a smart irrigation controller to help increase conservation efforts locally. Smart controllers use a Wi-Fi connection to tap into local weather stations to automatically adjust watering schedules based on past, present and future local weather conditions, ensuring that lawns and gardens only receive the precise amount of water they need in order to stay lush and green.

“Smart irrigation controllers are incredibly useful tools to assist with any irrigation routine,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “These devices are known to significantly reduce water usage by creating the appropriate watering schedules for the area. We encourage any residents of the POB community to install this helpful technology as it will create positive benefits to water conservation goals as well as lower their third quarter bills during the summer months.”

Smart irrigation controllers are effective at reducing water use because they use information such as local weather conditions, plant type and soil moisture levels to determine accurate landscaping water needs. The systems also adjust to weather conditions automatically, allowing lawns and gardens to thrive under optimal watering conditions without any user intervention. 

“While there are no current water shortages, it is our duty to take appropriate precautions to help preserve Long Island’s water source,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “There are many simple best practices that we can all use throughout the community to create a positive impact. Smart irrigation controllers can assist in improving conservation while creating healthier, more resilient lawns and simultaneously helps lower third quarter bills.”

Here are some simple ways to conserve water this summer:

  • Follow Nassau County’s Lawn Watering Ordinance
    • Watering is prohibited between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
    • Odd-numbered homes can only water on odd-numbered days.
    • Even and non-numbered homes can only water on even-numbered days.
  • Install a rain sensor or check that your current rain sensor is functioning properly.
  • Use a drip irrigation system to limit water lost through evaporation and improve amount of water delivered to root systems.
  • Consider planting drought-resistant shrubs and flowers in your garden or mulch around existing flower beds to retain additional water.

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469, email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

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In the Event of Power Outages and Other Impacts of Severe Weather, Water Will Keep Flowing

Plainview, N.Y. —In the event of a difficult hurricane season and other extreme weather, The Plainview Water District (PWD) is prepared despite any potential flooding or widespread power outages. The District is well equipped to continue to provide residents with the highest quality water possible, regardless of the weather. In the past, when our region has experienced significant storms—such as Irene, Sandy and Isaias—water never stopped flowing to Plainview-Old Bethpage (POB) residents.

“Every year, the District works diligently to take precautionary measures to plan for both short-term and long-term weather related situations,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “These plans ensure that our supply and distribution system operations can handle any severe weather event. We have planned accordingly and made the necessary investments in both infrastructure and manpower to keep water flowing twenty-four seven.”

All water pumps and treatment facilities rely heavily on electricity in order to operate. If a power outage does occur, the PWD has its own emergency generator facilities on standby at all of its plant sites to automatically take over supplying electricity. The generator equipment is maintained year-round and tested frequently to ensure it is always ready when needed. In addition, all members of the PWD are trained and prepared to use the equipment and handle many different emergency situations like hurricanes and tropical storms.

“Part of all of the PWD’s continued infrastructure and improvement projects are designed to provide back-up power to our facilities,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Ensuring that our facilities are self-sufficient and can remain operational is due to all of the hard work of our teams and professional engineers who design these systems.”

The District is also a member of New York’s statewide Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network (NYWARN) of utilities that encourages and supports emergency preparedness across the state, as well as disaster response and mutual aid for public and private water and wastewater utilities. As a member of NYWARN, neighboring water suppliers from across the state provide emergency assistance when necessary. The PWD is proud to help assist its neighboring water systems in case of an emergency.

“Any weather-related matters such as power outages can be extremely stressful situations to deal with,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “We want our residents to be fully aware that all District facilities and staff are prepared to act immediately should our facilities lose power or be impacted in any other way by a severe storm. The Plainview-Old Bethpage community can be sure that the District will continue to provide high-quality water, no matter the circumstances surrounding the weather.”

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469 email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

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District Continues Partnership with Plainview-Old Bethpage School District in Artistic, Educational Activity About Water Conservation

(L-R) The Plainview Water District Board of Commissioners Andrew Bader, Marc Laykind and Michael Chad  joined by the finalists of the 2023 PWD Water Conservation Poster Contest.

Plainview, N.Y.—The Plainview Water District (PWD), as part of its Preserve Plainview initiative, is proud to announce the winners of this year’s water conservation poster contest. The PWD, in partnership with the Plainview-Old Bethpage Central School District, launches this program every spring for students in the community grades one through six. This poster contest serves as an exciting educational activity to help teach students about the importance of water conservation, while letting them express their own creativity.

“The Plainview Water District thanks all of the students and their teachers for participating and submitting their amazing artwork to our 2023 poster contest,” said PWD Commissioner Laykind. “Every participant puts forth an incredible amount of effort and creativity into their posters, which makes determining a handful of winners so challenging. The District looks forward to continuing this long-standing tradition with the school district as our youth are an incredibly important part in the conservation of our community’s most precious natural resource.”

The winners for this year’s water conservation poster contest are as follows:

  • Grade 3
    • Eleanor Chan (Pasadena Elementary)
    • Zachary Sohn (Pasadena Elementary)
    • Zoey Kotchek (Pasadena Elementary)
    • Michael Herschfeld (Pasadena Elementary)
  • Grade 4
    • Kaitlyn Chen (Pasadena Elementary)
    • Sharon Cho (Pasadena Elementary)
    • Kiara Bajaj (Pasadena Elementary)
    • Sophie Santoro (Pasadena Elementary)
  • Grade 5
    • Jacob Sciaca – POB Middle School
    • Bhargav Shah – POB Middle School
    • Briana Lynch – POB Middle School
    • Elana Alter – POB Middle School
  • Grade 6
    • Sophie Menzildjian – POB Middle School
    • Lily Newman – POB Middle School
    • Kaitlyn Wang – POB Middle School
    • Ceylin Tumer – POB Middle School

“It is always an honor to get to work with the POB students and to see the time and originality they put into their entries,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Each year, the students amaze us with their submissions and knowledge on water conservation. The goal of this contest is to continue to educate young members of the community on the ways they can help us Preserve Plainview, so that they can bring these lessons with them into adulthood.”

The winners of the water conservation poster contest are selected after deliberation from the PWD’s Board of Commissioners on categories including creativity, design, and overall message. This year, the District collected submissions from students and the finalists were recognized at an award ceremony, which the PWD held on June 21, 2023 at its headquarters.

“It was a wonderful experience to take part in the District’s annual poster contest and to see the unique designs and hard work that goes into the submissions,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “Every student that participated should be incredibly proud of their work. We hope the knowledge they acquired through this effort will help their parents, friends and other community members to be more mindful of their water usage and will lead to them initiating new conservation measures around their home this summer.”

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469, email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

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Water District Offers Tips to Conserve Water and Help Lower Bills

Plainview, N.Y.—The Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind residents of the benefits of smart irrigation controllers and their use in the interest of water conservation. With the warm and dry summer weather quickly approaching, District-wide water pumpage numbers are expected to increase significantly due to the high use of irrigation systems. As part of its Preserve Plainview initiative, the District would like to provide residents with ways to save water around their homes and businesses.

“With the warmer weather, it is typical that the POB communities water usage grows significantly in comparison to other seasons,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “The increased usage of irrigation systems throughout the summer months often results in over-consumption and higher third-quarter bills. It is important that we all make an effort to use best practices when it relates our water usage in order to protect our vital resource.”

Water consumption in the Plainview-Old Bethpage community nearly triples during the summer months, which is most notably attributed to irrigation systems. Water conservation will not only reduce unnecessary water waste and save money, but will also significantly decrease excess pumpage of the aquifer and demand to the District’s groundwater wells and treatment systems.

The Plainview Water District highly recommends the implementation of smart irrigation controllers to help increase conservation efforts locally. Smart controllers use a Wi-Fi connection to tap into local weather stations to automatically adjust watering schedules based on local weather conditions, ensuring that lawns and gardens only receive the precise amount of water they need in order to stay lush and green.

“Smart irrigation controllers are valuable investments for anyone looking to make the irrigation process more convenient and eco-friendly,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “These systems are known to significantly reduce excess irrigation and water usage, while giving users healthier lawns. We highly encourage all customers to install this environmentally friendly technology.”

Smart irrigation controllers are effective at reducing water use because they use information such as local weather conditions, plant type and soil moisture levels to determine accurate landscaping water needs. The systems also adjust to weather conditions automatically, allowing lawns and gardens to thrive under optimal watering conditions without any user intervention. 

“As a community, it is our collective responsibility to take precautions to help preserve our most precious natural resource,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “Residents can participate in the simple act of conservation in many ways, such as installing a smart irrigation system or practicing better irrigation habits this summer. By doing so, we are not only preserving water and saving money, but are working to ensure that future generations of POB residents have access to this resource.”

Here are some simple ways to conserve water this summer:

·       Follow Nassau County’s Lawn Watering Ordinance

o   Watering is prohibited between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

o   Odd-numbered homes can only water on odd-numbered days.

o   Even and non-numbered homes can only water on even-numbered days.

·       Confirm your rain sensor is installed correctly and is functioning properly.

·       Mulch around flower beds to retain additional water.

·       Use a drip irrigation system to limit water lost through evaporation and improve the amount of water delivered to root systems.

·       Routinely check your irrigation clock and adjust time for seasonal temperatures and precipitation events.

·       Avoid watering on windy days.

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469, email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

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As seen in the Mid-Island Times 3.30.23

As seen in the Bethpage Newsgram March 24, 2023

Dina Scott, CPA, Joins the NYGFOA Long Island Regional Council  and LIWC Business Practices Committee

Plainview, New York—The Plainview Water District is proud to announce that its Business Manager, Dina Scott, CPA, has recently been appointed to the New York State Government Finance Officers Association’s (NYGFOA) Long Island Regional Council as well as Co-Chair of the Long Island Water Conference (LIWC) Business Practice Committee. Dina was asked to play a role in both of these well-respected organizations due to her depth of governmental financial and accounting experience.

“The Plainview Water District team is extremely proud of Dina’s great achievements and know these organizations will both benefit immensely by tapping into her years of experience,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “This recognition is very well deserved and speaks volumes to what she has been able to accomplish here on behalf of the Plainview-Old Bethpage community. Her vast knowledge will be a great asset to both the Long Island Water Conference and the New York State Government Finance Officers Association.”

The LIWC’s Business Practices Committee aims to serve as a resource to Long Island’s water providers as they navigate through new waves of state and federal grant funding. Mrs. Scott will serve as Co-Chair of the committee, providing guidance and expertise to local water providers with regards to grant management as well as compliance with many of the complex requirements included as part of grant administration. Her extensive expertise in this area and success in securing more than $34 million in grants for the Plainview Water District makes her an invaluable asset to the organization—especially as new government funding streams continue to become available. 

The New York Government Finance Officers’ Association is a not-for-profit professional membership organization and is composed of more than 1,110 public and private sector government finance professionals throughout New York State. The Long Island Regional Council is elected by the membership of the NYGFOA to serve their respective region and is made up of regional industry leaders in the sector. The goal of the Council is to ensure best practices are being used throughout Long Island, while providing support and assistance to local government financial professionals.

Ms. Scott has been a member of the NYGFOA for over 18 years. In 2022, she was part of the Advisory Board to the Long Island Regional Council. This year, she will serve on the Long Island Regional Council alongside the other leading financial governmental professionals across Long Island.

Dina Scott, CPA, joined the Plainview Water District in 2017 to assume the role as Business Manager. Ms. Scott uses her more than 18 years of experience in governmental accounting and auditing to oversee all budgetary and financial operations of the District and provides guidance on all related matters. Prior to joining the District, Dina was a supervisor for a well-respected accounting firm where she specialized in governmental audit and accounting services for local municipalities, including local water providers. She is a licensed Certified Public Accountant and holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting from St. Joseph’s College.

Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive District updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org and also follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

Testing must be facilitated annually by a certified backflow tester

Plainview, New York—With spring quickly approaching and residents getting started on projects in their yards and gardens, the Plainview Water District would like to remind homeowners to have their backflow prevention devices tested. Backflow prevention devices protect the public water supply from external contaminants such as lawn fertilizers. Testing these devices to ensure they are functioning properly before the high-demand irrigation season begins is vitally important to protect our water quality. 

“Annual testing and maintenance of backflow devices when home sprinkler systems come back online plays a huge role in ensuring high-quality water continues to flow to the homes and businesses we serve,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind “Additionally, for your protection, the Plainview Water District encourages customers to inquire if a tester is both licensed and insured.”

Backflow prevention devices keep potentially contaminated water out of the public water supply in the event that pressure drops due to fire emergencies, water-main breaks or other unexpected instances of differential pressure. Testing is particularly important before irrigation systems are turned back on and is often the most economical time to have the test performed.

“The PWD has always stressed the importance of taking preventative measures within your home, as it is impossible to predict an emergency,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “We ask that everyone take part in backflow testing as it is best to be prepared for any possible situation that may arise and can cause an adverse effect on our community’s water supply.”

To avoid potential fines, the District encourages residents to arrange for a New York State (NYS) Department of Health certified backflow tester to test your backflow prevention device to make sure it meets all mandated guidelines. The Plainview Water District has a list of New York State certified testers available on the Districts website for those residents who are unsure of who to contact. Any homeowner who has questions about having their device tested is encouraged to contact the District to learn more about the process.

“All residents and businesses throughout the POB community should always do what they can to ensure that our water supply remains safe for future generations and routine backflow device testing is one way to do just that,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “We ask our community to take part in this simple action that provides a factor of safety to the health and well-being of our community.”

If you have general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive District updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org and also follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

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District Has Been Awarded More Than $34 Million Over the Past Six Years

Plainview, New York—The Plainview Water District was recently awarded a $50,000 grant from Nassau County as part of the American Rescue Plan Coronavirus Local Fiscal Recovery Fund. The funding will help with costs associated with the design of the state-of-the-art Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) treatment facility at the District’s Plant 2 located on Donna Drive. With this latest award, the Plainview Water District has now secured 10 grants, totaling more than $34 million, over the past six years.

“The Plainview Water District has always been determined in its efforts to secure additional grant funding in order to minimize the cost impact for these infrastructure investments on our residents,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “That dedication has resulted and amassed to more than $34-million in additional funding over the past six years. The Board of Commissioners is extremely proud of this great accomplishment by the entire PWD team and is grateful to our elected officials that are making these funding streams available.”

The Plainview Water District continues to execute best practices in relation to financing these projects to ensure funds are being acquired and allocated in the most efficient ways. To date, the District went to bond to finance AOP infrastructure related investments totaling $25.8 million, but has saved taxpayers $7.1 million in future debt service costs by using dedicated reserve funds to finance portions of these projects. Furthermore, the District’s efforts to secure grant funding has saved taxpayers an additional $7.8 million, for a total of $14.9 million.

“Through the committed efforts of the District, the significant amount of funding that we have been able to receive through various grant opportunities has provided a substantial positive impact on the fiscal assets of the PWD,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “The team at the Plainview Water District has remained focused over the years on ensuring our District is making significant strides in acquiring funding from grant opportunities.”

PWD currently has six AOP treatment systems in use across its service territory and has been delivering water treated for emerging contaminants ahead of the new strict water quality standards established by New York State, taking effect in 2020. These systems, when coupled with granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration tanks, are the only approved method of removing 1,4-dioxane from the public drinking water supply. Securing more than $34 million in grant funding has been crucial to absorb the substantial investment associated with constructing the required treatment facilities at impacted plant sites throughout the District.

“It has been a remarkable experience to witness the dedication of our team as they continue to seek out this additional funding for the betterment of our community,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “Our resident’s water quality remains our top priority and the District continues to execute in any efforts that will assist that mission.”

If you have general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive District updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org and also follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

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Funds Will Cover Costs Associated Directly to the Construction of an Advanced Treatment Facility at Plant 7

Plainview, N.Y. (February 17, 2023)—The Plainview Water District (PWD) is in receipt of a grant award as part of New York State’s Water Infrastructure Improvement Act (WIIA) totaling $5.4 million. The funding will help with costs associated with constructing a state-of-the-art water treatment facility at the District’s Plant 7 well sites for the removal of emerging contaminants. To date, the Plainview Water District has secured more than $34 million in grants from New York State over the past five years.

“We are thankful to Governor Hochul and the state representatives that have made this funding available as it will help provide our residents with the highest quality water at a lower cost,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind “The Plainview Water District is proud of our actions and the progress we’ve made to complete required treatment systems to remove emerging contaminants, such as 1,4-dioxane and PFAS, from our groundwater. This grant funding allows us to complete these treatment projects while minimizing the financial burden on our residents.”

Construction at Plant 7, located on Washington Avenue, is currently underway and, when completed, represents a $6.8 million investment into the treatment facility. Over the next couple of months, the community will see the treatment facility take shape with an estimated completion date of the fall of 2023. This grant award has been crucial to minimizing financial impacts on residents as the District has been able to reallocate funding sources and use this grant money and its emerging contaminant reserve funds to minimize the amounts borrowed, which will save residents money in future debt costs.

“The significant level of funding we have received from the state to improve treatment facilities throughout the District is much appreciated and will allow us to continue providing the POB community with high quality water for decades to come,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Our team here is extremely proud of the fact that we mobilized to get treatment systems up and running without ever needing a compliance extension for the State’s new regulations. We are appreciative of the continued support from our region’s elected officials.”

The Plainview Water District currently has six advanced oxidation process (AOP) treatment systems in use across its service territory and has been delivering water treated for emerging contaminants ahead of the new strict water quality standards established by New York State, which went into effect in 2020. The treatment system, known as the Advanced Oxidation Process, when coupled with granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration tanks, is the only New York State Department of Health approved method of removing 1,4-dioxane from the public drinking water supply. Securing more than $34 million in grant funding has been crucial to absorb a substantial investment associated with constructing the required treatment facilities at impacted plant sites throughout the District.

“It has been a very humbling experience to see all of the details and work that goes into creating a new, state-of-the-art treatment facility and the speed in which these tasks are getting completed,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “The actions of this board and the District as a whole should provide comfort to every POB resident in the sense that the community’s water quality is our foremost priority. Our current and future residents all benefit from the actions and support happening at this time.”

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469, email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. To receive regular updates from the Plainview Water District, please sign up for email updates on the District’s homepage. Don’t forget to stay connected to the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PlainviewWaterDistrict

District Staff is Equipped to Quickly Respond and Repair Any Breaks

Plainview, N.Y.—The Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind residents that water main breaks occur more often during the winter months, but are a completely normal experience for this time of year. Fortunately, the District has a highly trained staff that is capable of quickly addressing these potentially emergency situations to a degree where nearby residents may not even know a break has occurred.

“Water main breaks are an unfortunate reality in any area that experiences extreme cold, and Long Island certainly qualifies,” said PWD Commissioner Marc Laykind. “Thankfully, the Plainview Water District has an experienced staff who responds to breaks 24 hours a day, seven days a week. We are committed to solving any water-related issue that may arise, to quickly restore residents’ water service.”

As the case with all cold-weather climates, water main breaks are an unfortunate reality as they typically occur when there is movement in the soil surrounding the water pipes or a freeze/thawing condition. Water mains are installed below the frost line; however, when the soil shrinks or swells it places pressure on the pipes causing a break. Though the length of time to repair a leak varies from incident to incident depending on its severity and how quickly the leak can be located, PWD employees are trained to repair all types of breaks efficiently, quickly and safely.

“While the District has systems in place to learn about main breaks shortly after they may occur, there are situations where they are not easily detected,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Anytime someone suspects there may be a water main break, or any other water-related issue in the community, they should never hesitate to contact us and report the situation.”

When water service is restored, residents may notice air in their pipes and the water may be discolored. The discoloration is not harmful, but can stain laundry. If you experience discolored water, let the cold water run from a faucet or tub at the closest area to your incoming service line for a few minutes or until it clears.

“Water main breaks may cause residents to experience a drop in water pressure or discolored water,” said PWD Commission Michael Chad. “Repairing these breaks is one of the most important things our staff does at PWD. Which is why we have dedicated crews to react quickly to each break, to ensure potential interruptions to residents’ water service are as minimal as possible.”

The Plainview Water District asks for residents’ help in reporting potential main breaks. Residents that notice areas of wetness along the curb, bubbling of water in the roadway or unexplainable icy conditions are encouraged to contact the Plainview Water District immediately at 516-931-6469.

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive updates by filling out the form at www.plainviewwater.org or by following the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

As seen in the Mid-Island Times January 26, 2023

Plainview, New York—The Plainview Water District (PWD) recently held its swearing-in ceremony to celebrate Commissioner Michael Chad’s election to serve on the Board of Commissioners for the next three years. Commissioner Chad, a long-time resident of Plainview, brings to the Plainview Water District a strong background in finance. As he enters his first term, Commissioner Chad will work alongside current commissioners Marc Laykind and Andrew Bader as well as the PWD’s staff to continue providing quality water and service to the residents of the POB community.

“I am truly humbled and thankful to have the support of the Plainview-Old Bethpage residents as I join the Plainview Water Districts Board of Commissioners,” said Commissioner Chad. “It will be an honor to serve on this Board and begin to work together to continue the District’s role as an industry leader here on Long Island.”

Commissioner Chad has been an accountant in private practice since 1988, after earning his BA in Accounting at the City University of New York’s Brooklyn College. His business expertise encompasses all aspects of general accounting, with a focus on corporate and personal income taxes. Commissioner Chad has also been a proud resident of Plainview since 1994, where he raised his two children and currently lives with his wife.

“Michael Chad is a proud member of this community, and we are fortunate to have his years of expertise in finance as we continue our mission of providing POB residents with the highest quality water possible,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “His background will make him a very effective member of the District’s Board of Commissioners, and we look forward to the insights and guidance he’ll provide throughout his term.”

Since 2014, Commissioner Chad has held several prominent roles in the Plainview-Old Bethpage Chamber of Commerce, initially, serving as the organization’s Treasurer and then on its Board of Directors. Commissioner Chad is also a long-time member of the Plainview Jewish Center, where he also serves on the Board of Directors of the Men’s Club.

If you have general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive District updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org and also follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

 Commissioner Michael Chad (left) sworn in as Plainview Water District Commissioner.

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As seen in the Bethpage Newsgram January 19, 2023

As seen in the Nassau Observer January 14, 2023

Plainview, N.Y.—Winter is here and so are colder temperatures for the next couple of months. The Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind residents about the importance of keeping fire hydrants throughout the Plainview-Old Bethpage community clear of snow and other winter debris. Hydrants that remain free of snow and ice can save first responders precious time when responding to an emergency situation.

“The colder temperatures are here and serve as a great reminder to our residents and business owners of the importance of ensuring hydrants throughout the community are kept clear this winter,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Keeping fire hydrants clear at all times allows the fire department to have uncompromised access in the case of an emergency.”

Residents are encouraged to “adopt” a nearby hydrant so there is a dedicated person responsible in keeping it clear during a snowstorm as well as reporting any potential issues. Clearing three feet of snow around the hydrant will allow firefighters to not only identify their locations with ease, but also provide uninterrupted access during a potential emergency.

“The POB community’s safety is our top priority, which is why we ask residents to not overlook the importance of this simple task,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “We encourage residents to be aware of where the nearest fire hydrant to your home is and to do your part in helping keep our neighbors safe.”

The District is also asking its residents to consider providing assistance to any friends, family members, or neighbors who are not able to clear their own hydrants. Those who leave their homes for the winter season are asked to please notify a neighbor who can ensure a hydrant is still cleared in their absence.

“Emergencies can occur at any point, which is why this initiative is so important,” said PWD Commissioner Michael Chad. “We can never predict when a fire hydrant is going to be needed, so we must ensure they remain easily accessible for our fire department at all times. In the event of an emergency, every second counts and completing this simple task can save emergency responders precious moments.”

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org. Follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

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As seen in the Mid-Island Times January 5, 2023

While all of us are enjoying the holidays, please know that if a water main break occurs, PWD is on it! Plainview Water District crews work quickly to identify leaks and make the necessary repairs.

Water main breaks occur when the freezing and thawing of soil causes the ground to move and, therefore cause water pipes to break.

If you see water bubbling up from the street, please let us know as soon as possible by reporting it to the District at 516-931-6469.

Simple Steps to Protect Against Freezing Pipes and Related Disruptions

Plainview, N.Y.— Winter weather is quickly approaching and it is time to properly prepare your home’s water system to avoid any unnecessary weather-related problems.

The Plainview Water District (PWD) wants all residents to be prepared for the coming freezing temperatures by ensuring they have the tools and tips to properly protect their water systems this winter.  

“There are many quick and simple tips to use to prepare your home’s water system for the winter months,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “If water systems are not properly winterized, they become susceptible to breaks or leaks when exposed to the colder weather. By following these winter preparation tips, POB residents can establish cautionary measures to help avoid water system related issues this winter.”

All Plainview-Old Bethpage residents are encouraged to use these tips to help avoid any damage caused by frozen pipes:

Outdoor Water Systems:

  • Don’t forget to turn off those hose spigots from inside the house and leave the outside valves open to prevent freezing.
    • This helps any trapped water to expand in freezing temperatures, preventing the pipe from bursting.
  • Disconnect and drain all hoses and keep in a warm, dry place for reuse in the spring.

Sprinkler Systems:

  • Sprinkler systems should be winterized to prevent possible leaks and damage to the system.
  • Leaks in sprinkler systems caused by burst pipes can be hard to identify when the systems return back on line, leading to increased water usage and decreased functionality.

 

Indoor Maintenance:

  • If a customer’s water service is in the boiler room or basement, check the area for broken windows or drafts.
    • Brisk winds and freezing temperatures can cause pipes and water meters to freeze or break.
  • Make sure pipes in unheated areas—like crawl spaces—are properly insulated.
  • It is also advised that all customers clearly label the main water shutoff valve in their home so they are prepared in the event of a water leak emergency.
    • Shutoff valves are typically located where the water service enters the house through the foundation.

Water Lines Leading to Unheated Structures:

  • Be sure to shut off and drain service lines leading to any unheated structures until spring to prevent breaks.

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org. Follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

District Was Awarded the Funding to Continue Water Treatment Infrastructure Upgrades for Emerging Contaminants

Plainview, N.Y.—The Plainview Water District (PWD) was recently awarded two additional grants totaling $6.4 million as part of New York State’s Water Infrastructure Improvement Act (WIIA). The funding will help with costs associated with constructing state-of-the-art water treatment facilities at the District’s Plant 3 and Plant 4 well sites for the removal of emerging contaminants. With this latest award, the Plainview Water District has now secured more than $34 million in grants from New York State over the past five years.

“We are thankful to Governor Hochul and the state representatives that have made this funding available as it will help us bolster our mission of providing the best possible water to the Plainview-Old Bethpage community,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind “The Plainview Water District is proud to have made substantial improvements to our treatment facilities and related infrastructure projects and this funding will help cover a majority of the costs associated with the investment that our residents will not have to bear.”

The Plainview Water District currently has six advanced oxidation process (AOP) treatment systems in use across its service territory and has been delivering water in compliance with the new strict water quality standards established by New York State. Plainview Water District’s AOP systems were put in place and running long before the NYS compliance date back in 2020. These systems, when coupled with granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration tanks, are the only approved method of removing 1,4-dioxane from the public drinking water supply. Securing more than $34 million in grant funding has been crucial to absorb the necessary investment associated with constructing these required treatment facilities at impacted plant sites throughout the District.

“The PWD is thrilled that we are able to continue to secure these grants on behalf of our residents that will allow us to continue improving upon the high-quality water we deliver to the POB community for decades to come,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “Our team has been laser focused on the issue of emerging contaminants for years now and we are extremely proud that our efforts have paid off for our community as we never sought or required a compliance extension for the State’s new regulations. We are appreciative of the continued support from our region’s elected officials as it will lessen the monetary impact these significant investments will have on our residents.”

The Clean Water Infrastructure Act of 2017 seeks to invest $2.5 billion in wastewater and drinking water projects and water quality protection across New York State. It provides at least $1 billion for the New York State WIIA, which assists municipalities in funding water quality infrastructure. To date, $900 million in Water Infrastructure Improvement Act and Intermunicipal Grant funding supports nearly $4.5 billion in total project costs for vital drinking and wastewater infrastructure projects statewide.

“We have been persistent in our mission of constructing new and improved treatment facilities, at the lowest cost possible and without sacrificing quality,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Our residents can rest assured that they are receiving the highest quality water possible and the continued investments being made will ensure that is the case for the future generations of POB residents.”

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469, email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. To receive regular updates from the Plainview Water District, please sign up for email updates on the District’s homepage. Don’t forget to stay connected to the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PlainviewWaterDistrict.  

Expired or Unwanted Medications are Properly Disposed to Keep from Entering Community’s Aquifer

Plainview, N.Y. (October 27, 2022)—The Plainview Water District (PWD) successfully hosted its fifth annual Pharmaceutical Take Back Day and collected more than 300 pounds of unwanted or expired medications. These medications will now be disposed of properly in order to prevent them from making it into the community’s sole-source aquifer for drinking water. This District has now collected and properly disposed of more than 1,400 pounds of medications since it began this annual event five years ago.

“We are pleased to offer this opportunity to POB residents for the past five years,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “The turn out that we see each year shows that there is a need for a service like this in our community. The District is proud and looks forward to continuing to serve and work with residents to come together and protect our shared environment and water supply.”

When someone improperly disposes of prescription and over-the-counter medicines, such as flushing them down the toilet or throwing them away in the garbage, there is a likelihood that the medications’ contents will ultimately make their way into the community water ways and water supply. If there is an elevated presence of toxins from pharmaceuticals in the groundwater, the District will have no choice but to invest in expensive treatment systems so the contaminants can be removed before they reach customers’ homes.

“Each year, the Plainview-Old Bethpage community continues to join us in participating in our annual Pharmaceutical Takeback Day to help us protect our water source,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “The District is grateful for the continued community-wide involvement and support, as this event would not be successful without it. We thank all of those who participated this year, for helping us protect our environment and water ways with the proper disposal of these medications.”

This year’s Pharmaceutical Take Back Day was once again held in partnership with the Nassau County Police Department. This anonymous, contactless drive-thru event included social distancing and safety protocols which helped the District bolster participation. The event was held at the PWD headquarters at 10 Manetto Hill Road on Saturday, October 22.

“Protecting our shared environment from these potentially harmful substances requires a collective community effort,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “For the past five years, the POB community has continued to show up to participate in the proper disposal of these substances. We continue to surpass the previous year’s collection totals and are thrilled to continue to offer this event annually. Thank you to all that came out to participate!”

For additional information about the Plainview Water District, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

As seen in the Bethpage Newsgram on September 29, 2022

As seen in the Mid-Island Times on September 29, 2022

District Once Again Provides Community with Convenient, Drive-Thru Opportunity to Safely Dispose Unwanted Medications

Plainview, N.Y. (September 22, 2022)— The Plainview Water District (PWD) is hosting its fifth annual Pharmaceutical Take Back Day on Saturday, October 22 between 10:00 am and 1:00 pm at 10 Manetto Hill Road. During this event, residents are encouraged to stop by to safely and properly dispose of any unwanted or expired medications. As a part of the PWD’s Preserve Plainview initiative, this annual drive-thru event ensures the proper disposal of pharmaceuticals and prevents them from making their way into the aquifer which is our community’s sole-source of drinking water.

“We encourage the Plainview-Old Bethpage community to participate in this event to dispose of their expired or unused medications in a safe and convenient way,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “As a community, it is our collective responsibility to protect our drinking water and continue to make all efforts to protect our shared environment. POB residents continue to impress us with their participation each year and we look forward to making this year the most successful yet.”

Normally, if someone flushes medications down the toilet or throws them in the garbage, there is a likelihood that the medications’ contents will ultimately make their way into the community waterways and water supply. If there is an elevated presence of toxins from pharmaceuticals in the groundwater, the District will have no choice but to invest in expensive treatment systems to remove any contaminants before they reach customers’ homes.

“As part of the Plainview-Old Bethpage community, we each have a responsibility to protect our environment from any potentially harmful substances for the simple fact that the activities we engage in on the surface will eventually impact our future water quality,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Pharmaceutical Take Back Day provides our community with an easy way to contribute to protecting our environment by ensuring unused medications don’t end up in the wrong hands or in the wrong places.”

This year, Pharmaceutical Take Back Day, which is held in partnership with the Nassau County Police Department, will take place on October 22nd from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm. All residents with unused or expired medications are encouraged to drop them off at the District’s headquarters—10 Manetto Hill Road—and may do so anonymously without having to leave their vehicles.  

“Pharmaceutical Take Back Day continues to be an effective event each and every year thanks to the members of the Plainview-Old Bethpage community,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “Coming together each year to collect nearly 300 pounds of unwanted medication, is simply a testament to the members of the POB community’s dedication to helping Preserve Plainview.”

For additional information about the Plainview Water District’s Pharmaceutical Take Back Day or other District initiatives, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

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As seen in the Bethpage Newsgram September 15, 2022

Residents and Commercial Properties Must Test Their Backflow Devices Annually, Deadline for Test Compliance Submission is December 31, 2022

Plainview, NY (September 12, 2022)—The Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind Plainview-Old Bethpage residents and commercial customers that the New York State Health Department (NYSDOH) and Nassau County Health Department require annual testing of backflow devices. This compliance testing must be performed by a certified backflow tester and completed prior to December 31, 2022 to ensure these devices are functioning properly.

“It is crucial to verify that a backflow device is functioning properly to ensure that potentially harmful contaminants are kept out of the POB community’s water system,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Backflow devices keep harmful chemicals like fertilizers, weed killers, and other lawn products from finding their way into the water distribution system water mains should a low-pressure event occur.”

Backflow devices are mechanical double-check valves that prevent water flow from reversing away from a building in the event of a loss of water pressure. A loss in pressure can occur when a fire is being put out or there is a water main break. These devices must be tested annually to make certain they are installed and functioning properly. Residents are required to have a backflow device if they have any of the following: in-ground sprinklers, fire lines, swimming pools, or a private well that is interconnected with the public water supply.

“Practicing prevention is a key component of keeping yourself and your neighbors throughout the POB community safe, as it is impossible to predict when and where an emergency resulting in a drop of pressure may occur,” said Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Testing backflow devices is part of these necessary precautionary and preventative efforts for all customers in our District. If a backflow device is not properly installed, chemicals and other pollutants can potentially and unknowingly infiltrate the community’s water.”

The District encourages all residents and businesses to arrange for a NYSDOH certified backflow tester to conduct their annual backflow test to avoid any potential penalties for noncompliance. The Plainview Water District keeps an up-to-date list of New York State licensed backflow testers on its website, www.plainviewwater.org/resources/backflow/. The District also maintains its own dedicated Cross-Connection Control Department to help residents with compliance questions that can be reached at 516-931-6469.

“We encourage residents to make this annual backflow testing a priority within their households, as it is such an important aspect of helping us Preserve Plainview,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field “We ask that any POB resident that may have any questions or concerns regarding backflow testing to please reach out to the District, so we can assist you in this important process.”

If you have questions or seek additional information, please call the District at 516-931-6469 or email info@plainviewwater.org. Residents are also encouraged to sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

Water District to Ensure Hydrants Are Operating Correctly as Part of Necessary Maintenance

Plainview, NY (September 1, 2022)—The Plainview Water District would like to inform the community that it has started its annual hydrant maintenance program. The purpose of this important task is to ensure that all of the fire hydrants within the District’s service territory are functioning properly and can supply adequate flow in the case of an emergency.

“Testing hydrants is a vital component of our overall maintenance program to ensure that this infrastructure is operational and available on demand when needed by fire departments and other emergency personnel,” said PWD Board Chairman Marc Laykind. “This routine operation is a major responsibility of ours to protect and preserve the health and safety of the community.”

During this routine maintenance—that is expected to occur through October 31, 2022—the District will perform pressure tests at each hydrant. These tests are performed by briefly opening up the hydrants to check that adequate flow and pressure is available throughout the District’s service territory.

While the hydrant maintenance is being performed, residents in the immediate vicinity of the work may experience temporary discoloration of their water. This discoloration primarily consists of harmless minerals that have built-up in the distribution system over time. Residents can rest assured that it does not affect the safety of the water. If you experience discoloration in your water after crews have been testing hydrants in your neighborhood, it is best to run your cold water tap at the lowest point of your home for approximately two minutes or until it clears up.

If residents should have any questions about the hydrant testing program, they are encouraged to call our customer service representatives at 516-931-6469 between the hours of 8am and 4pm Monday – Friday.

As seen in the Nassau Observer July 20 – July 26, 2022

As seen in the Nassau Observer June 22 – June 28, 2022

District Continues Partnership with Plainview-Old Bethpage School District on Fun, Educational Activity Teaching Youth About Water Conservation

The Plainview Water District Board of Commissioners, Andrew Bader, Amanda Field, and Marc Laykind are joined by all 18 winners of the 2022 PWD Water Conservation Poster Contest

Plainview, NY (June 14, 2022)—  The Plainview Water District (PWD), as part of its Preserve Plainview initiative, is proud to announce the winners of this year’s water conservation poster contest. The PWD, in partnership with the Plainview-Old Bethpage Central School District, launches this program every spring for students in the community grades one through six. This poster contest serves as a fun and educational activity to help teach students about the importance of water conservation and the preservation of our sole-source aquifer, while letting them express their own creativity.

“Each year we partner with the POB Central School District in this important effort. We are always impressed by the creativity the students of this community put into their water conservation posters,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “It’s challenging to pick only a handful of winners out of all the submissions because you can see the effort and thought that went into each and every one of them. We look to continuing this long-standing tradition with the school district as our youth are extremely important in the protection and conservation of our community’s most precious natural resource.”

The winners for this year’s water conservation poster contest are as follows:

Grade 1:

            Anthony Maffia, Tatum Hordos – Old Bethpage School

Grade 2:

            Kailyn Flores – Old Bethpage School

Grade 3:

            Molly Lowenfeld – Old Bethpage School

            Michelle Li – Judy Jacobs Parkway School  

            Michael Marchello – Judy Jacobs Parkway School              

Grade 4:

            Mia Lee – Old Bethpage School

            Noelle Reilly, Ashley Dunbar, Taylor Farrelly – Old Bethpage School

            Idina Hordos, Alyssa Fogel – Old Bethpage School

Grade 5:

            Patrick Dolan – Mattlin Middle School

            Andrew McLaughlin – Mattlin Middle School

            Isabella Sofia Eagle – Mattlin Middle School

Grade 6:

            Sarah Guo – Mattlin Middle School

            Nadia Lin – POB Middle School

            Heather Glykos – Mattlin Middle School

“It is an honor to once again see all the wonderful and inspiring artwork created by the Plainview-Old Bethpage students,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “As the community’s water supplier, it is gratifying to see the younger generations taking such an interest in cutting back on water usage. It is clear that the children of this community truly grasp the importance of water conservation.”

The winners of the water conservation poster contest are selected after deliberation from the PWD’s Board of Commissioners on categories including creativity, design, and overall message. This year, the District collected 159 submissions from students and the finalists were recognized at an award ceremony, which the PWD held on June 9, 2022 at its headquarters.

“Educating young members of the community on the ways they can help us Preserve Plainview is priceless because these are lessons that they will hopefully take with them well into adulthood,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Every single student who entered this year’s poster contest should be proud of themselves for their creativity and hard work. We hope the knowledge they acquired through this effort will help their parents, relatives and other members of the community be more mindful of their water usage and will lead to them initiating new conservation measures around their home this summer.”

For more information about water conservation, please visit the PWD website at www.plainviewwater.org/conservation/preserve-plainview. If you have questions or seek additional information, please call the District at 516-931-6469 or email info@plainviewwater.org. Residents are also encouraged to sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

District Will Receive More Than $19.2 Million in Additional Funding for Water Treatment Infrastructure Projects

The Plainview Water District (PWD) was recently awarded an additional $19.2 million in funding as part of New York State’s Water Infrastructure Improvement Act (WIIA). To date, these awards are the largest round of WIIA grant funding since the program was created in 2017 with a total of more than $638 million statewide and more than $250 million to Long Island alone. The Plainview Water District has now secured in excess of $28 million in grants from New York State over the past five years to help alleviate costs associated with constructing state-of-the-art water treatment facilities to remove emerging contaminants.

“We are thankful to Governor Hochul and the state representatives that have made this funding available so we can continue our mission of providing our residents with the highest quality water possible,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “The Plainview Water District is proud of the significant progress we have made on our treatment facilities and are thrilled that 100 percent of this grant money will be used to cover costs associated with past and present infrastructure improvements to treat emerging contaminants.”

The Plainview Water District currently has six advanced oxidation process (AOP) treatment systems in use across its service territory. These systems, when coupled with granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration tanks, are the only approved method of removing 1,4-dioxane from the public drinking water supply. Securing over $28 million in grant funding has been crucial to help absorb some of the costs to construct treatment facilities at impacted plant sites throughout the District.

“We have been relentless in our pursuit of constructing new treatment facilities to improve our public water system as well as identifying every possible avenue for funding,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “We appreciate the significant investment New York State is making into the Plainview-Old Bethpage community, and we are certainly grateful for their assistance in ensuring we are in the position to continue delivering high quality water to our residents.

The Clean Water Infrastructure Act of 2017 seeks to invest $2.5 billion in wastewater and drinking water projects and water quality protection across New York State. It provides at least $1 billion for the New York State WIIA, which assists municipalities in funding water quality infrastructure. To date, $775 million in Water Infrastructure Improvement Act and Intermunicipal Grant funding supports nearly $2.7 billion in total project costs for vital drinking and wastewater infrastructure projects statewide.

“We are very appreciative of all of the support from our region’s elected officials for prioritizing the funding needed to lower the capital costs of these infrastructure investments,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “This is exciting news for the Plainview community as current and future residents will continue to enjoy water that meets or surpasses some of the strictest water quality standards in the nation for generations to come.”

Plainview Water District Urges Residents to be Responsible With Lawn Chemicals and Fertilizers

As part of its Preserve Plainview initiative, the Plainview Water District would like to remind residents about the impacts that premature and excessive lawn fertilizing has on our environment and water supply. The District implores all residents to be mindful of the Nassau County “Fertilizer Law” that prohibits fertilizing prior to April 1 of each year.

“We want residents to enjoy their green lawns, but we want to make sure that they are being kept green in the most environmentally friendly way possible that complies with the rules and regulations of the county,” said Plainview Water District Chairman Marc Laykind. “To help protect our sole-source aquifer and other local water ways, we ask residents to adhere to Nassau County’s fertilizer law to help support our efforts of improving groundwater quality and protecting our environment.”

In accordance with Nassau County’s “Fertilizer Law,” all fertilizers are prohibited from being applied before April 1, 2022 and after November 15, 2022. Residents should always apply the minimum amount of lawn chemicals to the soil and make sure they are stored properly. Additionally, all fertilizers or other lawn chemicals must be kept in cool and dry locations inside of containers that are not prone to leaks. By following instructions listed on the packaging, homeowners can minimize the amount of fertilizer used, limit the amount that runs off into the ground and into our sewer systems so the impact to the environment can be kept to a minimum.

“Our weather is unpredictable this time of year and our region always seems to get some spring-like weather one day and then get hit with an end-of-March snowstorm or cold snap,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Applying fertilizers on frozen ground, or right before the ground refreezes, will take the fertilizers off your lawn and into our water ways. Save your money and our environment by ensuring you fertilize at the right time.”

Organic fertilizers—such as cotton seed meal, bone meal and manure—are other examples of effective alternatives to typical fertilizers that will benefit the environment. Biodegradable insecticides that break down to harmless substances in 2-to-21 days are also another effective yet safe way to treat your lawn.

“Purchasing the right type of fertilizer is as important as when you apply it to your lawn,” added PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “We want people to remember that the water we drink comes from beneath our feet so the more chemicals and toxins we put on the ground, the more they leach into our groundwater. When levels of nitrogen increase in our groundwater, the only option we have is to invest in treatment to ensure those elevated groundwater levels are not reflected in our drinking water. This is why we urge people to use natural, organic fertilizers at the right times rather than fertilizers packed with harmful chemicals.” 

Residents Opting to Install Home Filtration Systems Should Perform Routine Maintenance

For 95 years, the Plainview Water District has prided itself on its ability to routinely serve the Plainview-Old Bethpage community with nothing but the highest quality water possible. To do so, the District has and continues to invest in infrastructure improvements for water treatment and delivery as well as maintaining aggressive sampling and testing procedures that often go above and beyond required testing parameters.

“The men and women of the Plainview Water District are dedicated to this community and share a common goal of ensuring our residents continue to receive water that meets or surpasses all established water quality standards,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “In our opinion, home filtration systems are not necessary, mainly because our treatment systems already do so much more than what a standard residential water filter can provide. Those with questions about their water quality should feel free to contact us at any time or browse through the water quality reports and other fact sheets available on our website.”

There are many companies and organizations that try to use scare tactics in getting residents to purchase expensive water filters for their home that may ultimately have no impact on their water quality. Treatment is performed, as needed, at each of the District’s supply wells to ensure regulatory compliance with all federal, state and local standards. Each one of the District’s treatment facilities are designed by professional engineers and approved by the state and local health departments. New York State Health Department Certified Water Plant Operators are employed by the District to operate and maintain the water treatment systems. Water system operations are also monitored 24/7/365 to ensure treatment remains continuous and functions as it was designed.

“As a District, we are very fortunate to be working with some of the most knowledgeable professionals in the water treatment field,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “With something as important as water is to our daily lives, quality assurance is our most crucial task. Each component of our supply, treatment and distribution system is meticulously monitored, checked and verified so our residents can have peace of mind when it comes to the quality of their tap water.”

The Plainview Water District is required to test all its supply wells and various locations in the distribution system for more than 144 different parameters, including volatile and synthetic organic chemicals, inorganics, metals, bacteria, pesticides and herbicides. These tests are conducted by an independent, state-certified laboratory with results sent directly to officials at the Nassau County Health Department, who also conduct regular spot checks on their own. Results of these tests are published each year in the District’s annual drinking water quality report.

If a resident is considering the installation of a home water filter, please note that home filtration systems must be properly designed and maintained to the manufacturers’ specifications.  Failure to do so could actually make water quality worse. Any water quality testing that is performed in your home must be completed by a New York State Health Department certified laboratory for drinking water.  A home test kit will often provide grossly inaccurate results.

“Our water is disinfected with chlorine to proactively inhibit bacteriological development within our drinking water distribution system,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Should residents find the chlorine taste and odor to be objectionable, a granular activated carbon filter (GAC) can be used to help remove taste and odor. With that said, the District already utilizes GAC treatment at most of our well sites so any carbon filter will simply be removing the chlorine. Keep in mind that filling a glass pitcher of water and leaving it in the refrigerator overnight will allow the chlorine to dissipate and provide a similar result.”

If a resident is inclined to purchase a home filtration system, please know that there are many different types and functionalities.  The EPA and State Health Department do not endorse specific units and do not conduct independent testing of manufacturer’s claims. There are three different certifications to look for on the label.  These organizations include NSF International (NSF), Underwriters Laboratories (UL) and the Water Quality Association (WQA). If a home water treatment unit is not certified by one of these organizations, contact the manufacturer directly and ask for proof of the manufacturer’s claims specifically regarding the contaminants that concern you. Each of these organizations is accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and they each certify units using ANSI/NSF standards.

It is also incredibly important for residents to understand that there are no approved residential filtration systems capable of removing 1,4-dioxane from drinking water. To combat this issue, the District is investing more than $50 million in infrastructure improvements to build these required treatment systems. The District currently leads all Long Island water providers with having six Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) treatment systems already in operation.

Stay Informed in Case of a Water-Related Emergency

Water is the most precious natural resource there is, and it is extremely important in everyday life. The Plainview Water District (PWD) Board of Commissioners would like to remind the Plainview-Old Bethpage community of the importance of signing up and/or confirming their contact information with the District. This accurate contact information allows residents to receive emergency notifications about their water service in case a situation should ever occur.

“The Plainview Water District has the necessary systems in place to immediately reach our residents if a water-related emergency were to occur, however, we can only do so if we have the up-to-date contact information,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “The well-being of our community is extremely important to all of us at the District, and being able to inform our residents as quickly as possible of a water emergency is crucial.”

The PWD utilizes a reverse-911 system, provided by SwiftReach Networks, which is capable of delivering urgent messages directly to residents via phone call, text, or email. Once a resident or local business owner submits their up-to-date contact information, the system will be able to contact them with information regarding a water-related emergency in their area. All contact information is securely stored in PWD databases and will only be used in the case of an emergency.

To ensure a resident is signed up to receive emergency notifications or to confirm their contact information is accurate, please visit https://plainviewwater.org/resources/emergency-notification/ and fill out the appropriate form. The contact information received will only be accessed in the aforementioned circumstances of a water-related emergency and will be kept confidential. Residents can also update or confirm the information on file by calling the District at (516) 931-6469.

Permanent Treatment Facility for the Removal of 1,4-Dioxane Underway at Donna Drive Facility

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is proud to announce that it has begun construction on a new, state-of-the-art treatment facility at its water production site located on Donna Drive in Plainview. This new facility will house treatment equipment necessary for the removal of 1,4-dioxane from the groundwater, including advanced oxidation process (AOP) system and granular activated carbon (GAC) filters. This permanent facility will replace the temporary system installed in 2020, which enabled the District to remain ahead of the compliance timelines for emerging contaminant treatment established by the New York State Department of Health.

“The District has been steadfast in our infrastructure investment program as our commitment to serving Plainview-Old Bethpage residents with the highest quality of water never waivers,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Breaking ground on this facility is another important milestone for our community as this plant will continue to produce the highest quality water possible for generations to come.”

On August 26, 2020, the New York State Health Department finalized regulations establishing maximum contaminant levels (MCL) for emerging compounds 1,4-dioxane, PFOA and PFOS. This action made New York the first state in the country with an enforceable MCL for 1,4-dioxane. To ensure the District was ahead of the compliance curve with the new regulation, they embarked on an aggressive capital plan and installed a temporary treatment system—containing both AOP and GAC. Knowing a permanent facility would be coming in short order, the District and its engineers designed the temporary system in a way that the systems components would seamlessly integrate into the permanent facility.

“Our team has worked tirelessly to ensure we met the new compliance standards well ahead of them going into effect, and that required a lot of planning and foresight by our engineers to put the pieces of this giant puzzle together,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “Right now, this well site is seasonal, meaning it can only be used during the summer months when pumpage is at its peak. However, with the permanent facility, it will have the ability to operate year-round and provide our supply and distribution system with additional capacity.”

AOP treatment systems work by adding a small amount of oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) to the water to create a reaction as it passes through ultraviolet light which ultimately destroys the synthetic chemical. Once the reaction takes place, the water then travels into large GAC filtration vessels to remove any trace amount of oxidant that remain as well as organic and inorganic compounds (such as PFOA and PFOS). This treatment combination of AOP and GAC is the only approved method to remove 1,4-dioxane from drinking water.

“The investments the District has made and will continue to make have both an immediate and lasting impact on the Plainview-Old Bethpage community,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Upgrading existing and building new treatment facilities are expensive, but its needed, which is why we have concentrated so much of our efforts in getting these systems up and running quickly, while also ensuring we are doing it in the most cost-effective manner possible. We look forward to welcoming this new facility to the POB community in the fall.”

Across Long Island, it is estimated that more than $840 million in capital investments with an additional $50 million per year in increased operating and maintenance costs will be needed to treat all impacted wells. The Plainview Water District is considered a regional leader in these efforts as they have six AOP systems currently up and running, which is the most of any water provider on Long Island. To help alleviate the costs associated with constructing the new systems, the District has been awarded nearly $9 million in infrastructure grant funding from New York State to construct the necessary AOP treatment facilities.

Field Served as President for the Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners’ Association During 2021

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is proud to announce that Commissioner Amanda Field recently won an award from the Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners’ Association (NSWCA) for her tenacity in moving the organization’s mission forward during her time as president. In addition to her duties at the PWD, Commissioner Field was instrumental in being a central voice for Long Island water providers as they overcame many challenges presented throughout 2021.

“It is truly an honor to have my dedication to the quality of Long Island’s water be recognized by the members of the Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners’ Association,” said Commissioner Amanda Field. “I could not be prouder to serve as this organization’s president for the past year and for all of the accomplishments this organization has had in another year with unprecedented circumstances.

As President of the NSWCA, Commissioner Field initiated various many different endeavors to further advance the objectives of the organization. She initiated the development of a detailed press kit with an array of information designed to inform key stakeholders, such as State, County and Town officials, about the advances being made in the water industry, particularly from a treatment perspective. Field also lead the charge with the New York State Department of Civil Service to secure new test availability for water supplier staffs. In addition, Amanda was steadfast in better understanding how water suppliers in the region could access funding through the America Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). Lastly, Field was instrumental in serving as a liaison between the NSWCA and the Long Island Water Conference (LIWC), as well as the Clean Water Coalition.

Amanda Field has served on the PWD Board of Commissioners since winning her initial election in 2016. In her role as Commissioner at the PWD, she led several initiatives with the local school districts to provide younger generations with a greater understanding and appreciation for their community’s most precious natural resource: water. These efforts have led to a more robust list of opportunities for students of all ages to learn about the operations of the PWD and their water supply. Commissioner Field is also recognized for her leadership role in implementing the District’s Preserve Plainview campaign that aims to bring awareness and educate the many ways residents can conserve water and protect our region’s sole-source aquifer.

PWD Commissioner Amanda Field Accepts Award from the NSWCA for her Presidency

The Plainview Water District (PWD) recently held its swearing-in ceremony to commemorate Commissioner Andrew Bader’s reelection to the Board of Commissioners for another three years. Commissioner Bader, who first started serving on the Board in 2010, has been committed to serving the Plainview-Old Bethpage residents.

“It is truly an honor to continue having the support of our residents for this position,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “I take my responsibilities very seriously. The District has been and will continue to embark on the most significant infrastructure projects in our more than 90-year history and I sincerely appreciate the trust and confidence this community has shown me. My fellow commissioners, Marc Laykind and Amanda Field, and I will never stop working for the betterment of our community’s water system.”

During his tenure, Commissioner Bader has helped advocate for more widespread adoption of several important water conservation measures to preserve the community’s most precious natural resource. Commissioner Bader has also been instrumental in spearheading the District’s efforts on emerging contaminant treatment that has positioned the District as a leader in this island-wide endeavors.

“I am proud of the advancements the District has taken and will continue to make in constructing necessary treatment facilities now and for our future generations,” added Commissioner Bader. “The District has been extremely aggressive in pursuing our capital infrastructure investments, which have led to the successful installation of a region-leading six advanced oxidation process systems for the removal of 1,4-dioxane.”

Commissioner Bader has also served on several different positions within Long Island’s water industry, including holding the position of chairman of the Long Island Water Conference, president of the Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association and a proud member of the American Water Works Association.

Andrew Bader is sworn in as Plainview Water District Commissioner at the most recent District Board meeting.

Plainview Water District Collects a Mountain of Toys to Support the Foundation

(From L-R) Plainview Water District Commissioners Andrew Bader, Amanda Field, and Marc Laykind stand behind the generous toy donations that will be sent to support the Toys for Tots Foundation.

Plainview-Old Bethpage continues to show its generosity year in and year out by contributing to the Toys for Tots Foundation. As it has done in years past, the Plainview Water District (PWD) proudly partnered with the Toys for Tots Foundation, sponsored by the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. This year, over 100 toys were collected by the District.

“We are consistently impressed each year with the kindness and participation shown by the members of our community during the holiday season,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Despite all of the challenges of the past year, we had an excellent turnout. These contributions are so valuable in making certain the holiday season is special for so many others. We look forward to continuing to support the Toys for Tots Foundation next holiday season.”

The U.S. Marine Corps Reserve ‘Toys for Tots’ Foundation is a nonprofit organization that aims to provide all children across the United States with happiness and joy throughout the holiday season. Through the gift of a new toy, disadvantaged children will not be overlooked during the holidays, and will know that a community of people cares for them.

The Plainview Water District thanks the community again for their generous contribution during this holiday season.

New Water Rates Go into Effect on January 1, 2022

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is in the process of investing more than $54.5 million as part of its 5-year capital plan to improve the community’s drinking water infrastructure and construct required, state-of-the-art treatment systems needed to remove emerging contaminants such as 1,4-dioxane. In order for the District to remain financially secure and perform these required tasks, additional revenues are needed to pay for these investments and the significant increased operating costs associated with them. For the average resident using 30,000 gallons of water per quarter, the new rates will result in an increase of $8.82 per quarter or $2.94 per month.

“The District has recently been in a very favorable financial position, so we have been able to hold the line on rates the past four years despite millions of dollars already spent and committed to critical infrastructure projects,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “It is the District’s duty to serve the highest quality water possible to our residents, and this rate increase is needed for us to carry out that mission. We continue to do what we can to find alternative sources of funding, whether it be from grants or litigation against the polluters and chemical manufacturers. For the time being, this is an action we must take to continue improving the drinking water we provide to our customers.”

Aside from the staggering capital costs associated with building Advanced Oxidation Process treatment facilities, which are needed to remove 1,4-dioxane, the District’s operating budget associated with running these facilities has increased significantly. The District’s electricity costs alone have increased by more than a half million dollars per year due to the significant demand for power these systems require.  

“Over the past couple of years, we have done everything we can to find efficiencies in our operations and work to stretch our existing budgets as much as possible,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “Due to our awards of grant funding, financial planning and use of reserve funds, we have been able to prolong the need for this rate increase until now. We know our residents appreciate all that we are doing to improve water quality within the community, and we hope they understand the need for these minimal rate increases as a result.”

As 2021 began, the District employed the services of a third-party consultant that specializes in municipal water district rate structures. The District tasked the consultant to calculate the revenues needed while reducing the impact to residents as much as possible. As a result, the District was able to remain within the tax cap while implementing a modest increase to each of the District’s rate tiers as well as create an additional conservation tier. The two conservation rate tiers, which start for customers using more than 126,000 gallon per quarter, are aimed at incentivizing these residents to use less water, which, in turn, helps the District save on various operating expenses while also promoting water conservation.

“In terms of usage, the top three percent of customers who consume more than 130,000 a quarter will experience an estimated increase of $29, where our lower users, those using approximately  20,000 per quarter, will experience an increase of $5.72. Minimum bills are only going up $2 per quarter,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Implementing water conservation tactics, such as replacing your standard irrigation timer with a smart irrigation controller, is the best way for residents to offset these increases. Conserving water will reduce resident bills and also lower our operating expenses. Conservation is a win-win scenario.”

The colder winter months are here, and soon there will be snow in the forecast. The Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to stress the importance of keeping fire hydrants across the Plainview-Old Bethpage community clear of snow and other winter debris. Hydrants that remain free of snow can save first responders precious time when responding to an emergency situation.

“The arrival of more consistent cold weather provides for a great opportunity to remind our residents about the important responsibility they have of ensuring hydrants are kept clear this winter,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “As a community, we owe it to our dedicated firefighters to make sure they always have quick and easy access to fire hydrants at all times. Every moment counts when responding to an emergency, so please keep your hydrants clear.”

Residents are encouraged to “adopt” a nearby hydrant so there is a dedicated person responsible in keeping it clear during a snowstorm as well as reporting any potential issues. Clearing three feet of snow around the hydrant will allow firefighters to not only identify their locations with ease, but also provide uninterrupted access during a potential emergency.

“An emergency can occur at any point, so we encourage all of our residents to never assume the fire hydrant in front of their home won’t be needed,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “All residents are asked to speak with their neighbors before the snow starts to fall so there is no question about who will be taking responsibility for clearing the hydrant in a timely fashion.”

The District is also asking its residents to consider providing assistance to any friends, family members, or neighbors who are not able to clear their own hydrants. Those who leave their homes for the winter season are asked to please notify a neighbor who can ensure a hydrant is still cleared in their absence.

“Our community’s safety is our top priority at all times, and the District wants to ensure this simple, yet important step is never overlooked,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “All of us at the Plainview Water District appreciate the attention our residents pay to this crucial task and thank them in advance for doing their part in protecting our community.”

Plainview Water District Responds Urgently to Any Water-Related Emergency

The Plainview Water District (PWD) knows the last thing its community wants during this time of holiday cheer is a water main break, but they are inevitable given the upcoming frigid temperatures. As the winter weather continues to set in, main breaks can become a more common occurrence, but the District is prepared to respond quickly and effectively to minimize the disruption to its residents.

“Water main breaks are inevitable in any region that experiences temperature fluctuations throughout the winter,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “While it is impossible to predict when and where a main break will occur, the Plainview Water District is prepared to respond to them at all hours in order to reduce the potential interruptions to our residents’ water service.”

As the case with all cold-weather climates, water main breaks are an unfortunate reality. Water main breaks typically occur when there is movement in the soil around water pipes or a freeze/thawing condition. Water mains are installed below the frost line; but, when the soil shrinks or swells, it increases pressure on the pipes causing a break. Though the length of time to repair a leak is different for each individual break due to location and severity, all PWD employees are trained to repair all types of breaks efficiently and quickly.

“The District is so proud to have some of the most hardworking and dedicated staff in the industry,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “As soon as the PWD is alerted of a break, a team is dispatched immediately to minimize disruptions and perform the repair in an expeditious manner.”

For Plainview-Old Bethpage residents, the PWD encourages residents to be on the lookout for any water main breaks. Residents that notice a significant reduction in the water pressure from faucets, areas of wetness along the curb, bubbling of water in the roadway, or any unexplainable icy conditions are encouraged to contact the Plainview Water District immediately at 516-931-6469.

“The District has systems in place that are effective at quickly identifying main breaks, but there are situations where they cannot be detected right away,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “If a resident suspects there may be a water main break in their neighborhood, we urge them to contact the PWD right away and report the situation. Once a break is located, it can be repaired quickly.”

Water main breaks may also result in residents experiencing air in their pipes and/or discolored water. Water discoloration is not harmful for consumption, but can stain laundry. If you experience discolored water, please let the cold water run from a faucet or tub at the closest area to your incoming service line for approximately three minutes or until it clears.

Award Given for Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) Pilot Studies

District Leads Long Island with Six AOP Treatment Systems Installed

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is proud to announce it has received the Gold Engineering Excellence Award from the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) New York for their Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) pilot studies done in conjunction with their consulting engineers from H2M architects + engineers. This award represents all of the hard work the PWD has put in over the past several years in piloting AOP treatment systems to treat the community’s drinking water for the emerging contaminant 1,4-dioxane. The initial pilot studies completed have now culminated into the District having six AOP systems up and running in record time.

“Receiving the Gold Engineering Excellence Award is a testament to the dedication from everyone here at the Plainview Water District and our consultants at H2M architects + engineers,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Our commitment to the rapid installation of AOP treatment systems to ensure the safety of our residents’ drinking water has been second to none these past few years. We are truly honored to have the recognition from ACEC New York for our collective efforts.”

Before installing the new AOP water treatment technology, water providers were required to test the efficacy of the treatment systems by conducting pilot studies on each impacted wells. These studies and the data generated were instrumental in allowing the District to quickly construct full-scale AOP treatment systems. This award further cements the PWD as a leader in this island-wide treatment endeavor as the information collected during the pilot period was instrumental to the deployment of AOP systems throughout the District.

“All of us at the Plainview Water District are committed to not only distributing the highest quality water possible, but being leaders in water treatment,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “From my fellow commissioners and staff as well as our engineers, this award is a reflection on our team and speaks volumes to their dedication to keeping the water flowing safely and efficiently in Plainview-Old Bethpage.”

The most recent AOP system to come online, at Plant 3 on Orchard Street, is a $2.2 million system specifically designed to produce up to two million gallons per day of the highest quality drinking water for the Plainview-Old Bethpage community. The PWD now has the ability to treat over 11 million gallons of water every day for 1,4-dioxane. The District had planned these treatment facilities back in 2018, two years before these regulations were put into effect. Due to their efforts, the PWD was able to ensure all water being distributed to the community was in compliance with the maximum contaminant level (MCL) regulations before they went into effect.

“Our team here at the PWD has been nothing short of spectacular in getting these facilities up and running as quickly as they did,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Our District has always been committed to making the necessary investments to benefit the community, but this recent wave of infrastructure needs was certainly unprecedented in both size and scope. We are honored to have this award to recognize all of the progress we have made.”

Since 2017, the Plainview Water District has been awarded over $9 million in infrastructure grant money in order to build these necessary AOP treatment facilities. The removal of 1,4-dioxane from wells across Long Island is estimated to cost $840 million in capital investments with an additional $50 million per year in increased operating and maintenance costs.

The Gold Engineering Excellence Award Given to the Plainview Water District from ACEC New York.

Simple Steps to Protect Against Freezing Pipes and Related Disruptions

The heart of the winter will be here before you know it and, as it does every year, the colder weather can wreak havoc on a home’s water system if it isn’t properly prepared. The Plainview Water District (PWD) wants all residents are prepared for the coming temperature drop by ensuring they have the tools and tips to properly protect their water systems this winter.  

“There are fairly simple tips to prepare your home’s water system for the cold winter months, but failing to do so can have some costly consequences if areas in your home are not protected,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “When water systems are not adequately winterized, they become subject to breaks and/or leaks when exposed to stretches of cold weather. By following these tips, our residents can help themselves avoid the grief and expense that frozen pipes can bring.”

All Plainview-Old Bethpage residents are encouraged to use these tips to help avoid any damage caused by frozen pipes:

Outdoor Water Systems:

  • Don’t forget to turn off those hose spigots from inside the house and leave the outside valves open to prevent freezing.
    • This allows any trapped water to expand in freezing temperatures, preventing the pipe from bursting.
  • Disconnect and drain all hoses and keep in a warm, dry place for reuse in the spring.

Sprinkler Systems:

  • Sprinkler systems should be winterized to prevent possible leaks and damage to the system.
  • Leaks in sprinkler systems caused by burst pipes can be hard to identify when the systems return back on line, leading to increased water usage and decreased functionality.

Indoor Maintenance:

  • If a customer’s water service is in the boiler room or basement, check the area for broken windows or drafts.
    • Brisk winds and freezing temperatures can cause pipes and water meters to freeze or break.
  • In preparation, locate the main water shutoff valve in your home in case of an emergency and make sure pipes in unheated areas—like crawl spaces—are properly insulated.
  • It is also advised that all customers clearly label the main water shutoff valve in their home so they are prepared in the event of a water leak emergency.
    • Shutoff valves are typically located where the water service enters the house through the foundation.

Water Lines Leading to Unheated Structures:

  • Be sure to shut off and drain service lines leading to any unheated structures until spring to prevent breaks.

District Headquarters to Serve as an Official Drop-Off Location for the Charitable Foundation

In order to spread holiday spirit throughout the Plainview-Old Bethpage community, the Plainview Water District (PWD) is once again proud to partner with the Toys for Tots Foundation, sponsored by the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. The PWD headquarters, located at 10 Manetto Hill Road, will serve as an official drop-off location for the foundation. The District encourages residents to donate new and unwrapped gifts to help less fortunate children,

“With so facing difficulties throughout this last 18 months or so, many of our neighbors could really use a lift in spirits this holiday season,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Even the smallest gift donation can go a long way with a child who would otherwise be left out during the holidays. We encourage all those able to support this program in Plainview-Old Bethpage to help us bring some joy to children in need this year.”

New and unwrapped gift donations can be dropped off at the PWD headquarters beginning on Monday, November 1 until Friday, December 10. Since the District started this partnership several years ago, hundreds of toys have been donated from the community to support this cause.

The U.S. Marine Corps Reserve ‘Toys for Tots’ Foundation is a nonprofit organization that aims to provide all children across the United States with happiness and joy throughout the holiday season. Through the gift of a new toy, disadvantaged children will not be overlooked during the holidays, and will know that a community of people cares for them.

The Plainview Water District thanks the community in advance for their generous contribution.

Expired or Unwanted Medications are Properly Disposed to Keep from Entering Community’s Sole-Source Aquifer

The Plainview Water District (PWD) successfully hosted its fourth annual Pharmaceutical Take Back Day and collected over 320 pounds of unwanted or expired medications. These medications will now be disposed of properly in order to prevent them from making it into the community’s sole-source aquifer for drinking water. This District has now collected and properly disposed of more than 1,100 pounds of medications since it began this annual event four years ago.

“Each year, we are so pleased to offer this opportunity to our residents as the turn out clearly represents a need for this type of service,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “The District’s Preserving Plainview initiative is important and we are so proud of the embrace it has had within the community. We look forward to continuing the offering of this event every year that provides so much benefit to our environment and water supply.”

When someone improperly disposes of prescription and over-the-counter medicines, such as flushing them down the toilet or throwing them away in the garbage, there is a likelihood that the medications’ contents will ultimately make their way into the community waterways and water supply. If there is an elevated presence of toxins from pharmaceuticals in the groundwater, the District will have no choice but to invest in expensive treatment systems so the contaminants can be removed before they reach customers’ homes.

“The response from the Plainview-Old Bethpage community has been tremendous by the amount of pharmaceuticals disposed of this year,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “We continue to surpass the previous years’ collections totals and that is very encouraging that more and more residents see the importance of their proper disposal. Thank you to all those who took time out of their day to participate!”

This year’s Pharmaceutical Take Back Day was once again held in partnership with the Nassau County Police Department. This anonymous, contactless drive-thru event included social distancing and safety protocols which helped the District bolster participation. The event was held at the PWD headquarters at 10 Manetto Hill Road on Saturday, October 23.

“Protecting our water source from any potential harmful substances is something that requires a community-wide effort and one that this community has time and time again embraced,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Our environment and our waterways are in better shape due to those who participated this year and we look forward to seeing them and more of their neighbors next year.”

For additional information about the Plainview Water District, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

Safe, Contactless Drive-Thru Responsibly Disposes Hundreds of Pounds of Unwanted Medications

Plainview, N.Y. (October 12, 2021)— The Plainview Water District (PWD) is hosting its fourth annual Pharmaceutical Take Back Day on Saturday, October 23 between 10am and 1pm at 10 Manetto Hill Road, where residents are encouraged to bring any unwanted or expired medications to be disposed of properly. As a part of the PWD’s Preserve Plainview initiative, this annual drive-thru event ensures the proper disposal of pharmaceuticals and prevents them from making their way into the community’s sole-source of drinking water.

“We encourage all members of the Plainview-Old Bethpage community to take advantage of this event to dispose of their expired or unused medications in the safest and most convenient way possible,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Our collective responsibility as a community is to protect our sole-source of drinking water. POB residents continue to impress us with their participation each year and we look forward to making this year the most successful yet.”

Normally, if someone flushes medications down the toilet or throws them in the garbage, there is a likelihood that the medications’ contents will ultimately make their way into the community waterways and water supply. If there is an elevated presence of toxins from pharmaceuticals in the groundwater, the District will have no choice but to heavily invest in expensive treatment systems so the impurities can be removed before they reach customers’ homes.

“We could not be prouder of the community’s residents and how receptive they’ve been to this program we launched several years ago,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “With nearly 300 pounds of unwanted medications being collected last year, the District is hoping for another great turnout to help continue preserving Plainview’s water.”

This year, Pharmaceutical Take Back Day, which is held in partnership with the Nassau County Police Department, will once again include all social distancing and safety protocols. All residents with unused or expired medications are encouraged to go to the District’s headquarters at 10 Manetto Hill Road on October 23 from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm.

“Protecting our environment from potentially harmful substances is the responsibility of each and every resident of our community,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Pharmaceutical Take Back Day is a wonderful opportunity for community members to do their part in keeping our aquifer safe.”

For additional information about the Plainview Water District’s Pharmaceutical Take Back Day or other District initiatives, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

Residents Must Test Their Backflow System Annually, Deadline for Test Compliance Submission is December 31, 2021

The Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind residents that the New York State Health Department (NYSDOH) and Nassau County Health Department require testing on backflow devices. This compliance testing must be performed by a certified professional, and is extremely important in ensuring the safety of Plainview-Old Bethpage’s water supply.

“Having a proper, functioning backflow system is necessary to prevent contaminants from entering the District’s distribution system,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Weed killers, fertilizers, and other lawn products will not find their way back into the public water supply after a period of low pressure with a certified backflow device.”

Backflow devices are mechanical double-check valves that prevent the water flow from reversing during a loss of water pressure. This loss can be caused by firefighter use or a water main break. These devices must be tested annually to make certain they are installed and functioning properly. Backflow devices prevent pollution and contamination of the public water supply during times of fluctuating pressure. Residents need a backflow device if they have: in-ground sprinklers, fire lines, swimming pools, or a private well that is interconnected with the public water supply to name a few conditions.

“Slight water pressure changes in the distribution system is not uncommon during the year due to differing water demands,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “If a backflow device is not properly installed, chemicals and other pollutants can easily infiltrate our community’s water. It is important to heed the Department of Health’s warnings and get your device tested to help you and your neighbors avoid any potential dangers with our community’s water supply.”

The District encourages residents to arrange for a NYSDOH certified backflow tester to conduct their annual backflow test and avoid any penalties for noncompliance. The Plainview Water District keeps an up-to-date list of New York State licensed backflow testers on its website, www.plainviewwater.org/resources/backflow/. The District also maintains its own dedicated Cross-Connection Control Department to help residents with compliance questions that can be reached at 516-931-6469.

New Advanced Oxidation Process Treatment System Specifically Designed to Remove 1,4-Dioxane

PWD Leads Long Island Providers with Most AOP Systems Installed

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is proud to announce that it has recently received approval from the New York State and Nassau County Health Departments to bring an additional Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) treatment system online. This AOP treatment system is the sixth state-of-the-art treatment system constructed by the District for the removal of 1,4-dioxane from the community’s drinking water and makes the Plainview Water District Long Island’s leader in 1,4-dioxane treatment.

“This is a watershed moment for the District, our community and the quality of its drinking water,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “We are proud of the leadership this District has shown to expedite the installation of treatment for 1,4-dioxane to meet the new, strictest-in-the-nation standards. The proactivity of our team and the aggressive stance we collectively took to get these systems up and running in an expeditious manner is a testament to our dedication to provide the residents of Plainview-Old Bethpage with the highest quality water possible.”  

The latest plant to come online, Plant 3, located on Orchard Street, is a $2.2 million system specifically designed to produce up to two million gallons per day of the highest quality drinking water for the Plainview-Old Bethpage community. The District now has the ability to treat more than 11 million gallons of water every day for 1,4-dioxane. The PWD had begun planning these treatment facilities back in 2018, two years before these regulations were put into effect. Due to their tireless efforts, the District was able to ensure all water being distributed to the community was in compliance with the regulations before they went into effect.   

“My fellow commissioners, our staff and our engineers deserve all the credit in the world for getting us to this point in such a short period of time,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “We have been planning to execute this treatment endeavor for years now as it was always our policy to not seek a deferral from the Health Department and extend the amount of time we had to come into compliance. We met this goal and with the sixth AOP system now online, we have the capacity in place to ensure our residents are always receiving the highest quality water possible.”

AOP treatment systems work by adding a small amount of oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) to the water to create a reaction as it passes through ultraviolet light which ultimately destroys the synthetic chemical. Once the reaction takes place, the water then travels into large Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) filtration tanks to remove any trace amount of oxidant that remain as well as organic and inorganic compounds (such as PFOA and PFOS). This treatment combination of AOP and GAC is the only approved method to remove all of these emerging contaminants by the NYSDOH and local health department.

“If you fail to plan then you plan to fail, which is why we dedicated so much time and resource to ensure our District was well positioned to meet these new water quality standards,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “The investments being made now will not only have an immediate impact, but they will benefit the future generations of our community. While we still have a lot of work ahead of us, we take an immense amount of pride in what we have already been able to accomplish.”

The Plainview Water District has been awarded nearly $9 million in infrastructure grant money to construct the necessary AOP treatment facilities. The removal of 1,4-dioxane from wells across Long Island is estimated to cost $1 billion in capital investments with an additional tens of millions per year in increased operating and maintenance costs.

Despite Power Outages and Other Impacts of Severe Weather, Water Service is Never Interrupted

Plainview, N.Y. (July 29, 2021)—Hurricane season is back in full force, and Long Island is sure to have its periods of severe weather this summer and into the Fall. Despite the occurrences of flooding and widespread power outages, the Plainview Water District (PWD) is prepared and well equipped to continue providing its residents with the highest quality water possible, regardless of the weather.

“The Plainview Water District has taken both short-term and long-term planning and resiliency measures to ensure our supply and distribution system operation can handle any severe weather event,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “The last thing anyone needs during a major storm is for their water to stop flowing. Luckily for our residents, we have made the necessary investments in both infrastructure and manpower to keep water flowing twenty-four seven.”

All water pumps and treatment facilities rely heavily on electricity in order to operate. If a power outage does occur, the PWD has its own emergency electrical generator facilities on standby at its plant sites to take over supplying electricity to is key facilities. The generator equipment is maintained year-round and tested frequently to ensure everything is always ready when needed. In addition, all members of the PWD are trained and prepared to use the equipment and handle many different emergency situations like hurricanes and tropical storms.

“All District facilities and staff are prepared to act immediately should our facilities lose power or be impacted in any other way by a severe storm,” said Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Our emergency action plan has dedicated response teams that are ready to be mobilized at a moment’s notice. Fortunately for the community, they typically don’t ever have to worry about their water service stopping due to a storm thanks to our team’s preparedness.”

The District is also a member of New York’s statewide Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network (NYWARN) of utilities that encourages and supports emergency preparedness across the state, as well as disaster response and mutual aid for public and private water and wastewater utilities. As a member of NYWARN, neighboring water suppliers from across the state provide emergency assistance when necessary. The Plainview Water District also has a seat at Nassau County’s Office of Emergency Management, where water and utility suppliers across the county coordinate an emergency response in case of a region-wide power outage. The PWD is proud to help assist its neighboring water systems and other Nassau County utility suppliers in case of an emergency.

“Ensuring that our facilities can be self-sufficient without a moment’s notice is only possible because of the great work of our teams and professional engineers who designed the systems to operate in any condition,” said Commissioner Amanda Field. “Power outages can be extremely stressful periods of time for residents, so we want everyone in the POB community to rest assured that when it comes to all things water, we have it under control.”

Third Quarter Bills Are Traditionally Higher Due to Irrigation Systems Being Online, Now is the Time to Keep Water Usage Low 

Summer is coming to an end quickly, but it is always important to begin implementing water conservation methods. The Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind its residents that third quarter bills can be much higher than normal due to irrigation systems being online throughout the summer months. The demand for water is heightened with hotter temperatures and the need to keep lawns green, so many residents experience a higher water bill.

“Water bills almost always spike during the summer, very similarly to gas and oil bills being heightened in the winter,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Your water bills are completely based on usage, so residents’ bills fluctuate depending on the volume of water used during the quarter.”

Water bills are consistently the least significant utility bill in cost for residents, but the District makes a consistent effort to educate the community about the importance of water conservation and tips to keep bills as low as possible. These tips include following the Nassau County lawn watering ordinances and instituting smart irrigation controllers to cut down on water waste as part of the District’s Preserve Plainview initiative. Smart controllers can save residents an average of 40% on their summer water bills by cutting down on unnecessary water waste.

“Installing smart irrigation controllers are the most efficient way to cut down on your water bills,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “For those residents who see a large spike in their third quarter bills, these controllers can be a huge help in lowering bills and reducing water waste. Savings generated by these systems can really add up and even pay for themselves within the first few years after installation.”

The Plainview Water District billing structure is a block rate form, meaning the price of water per 1,000 gallons increases as a customer reaches higher tiers of usage. There are currently six rate tiers with the highest rate block only impacting customers who use more than 125,000 gallons of water in a given quarter. This highest rate tier is designed to motivate the District’s highest water users to conserve water.

“Most irrigation systems turn on while the homeowner is sleeping, so they are usually unaware of the amount of water they can consume,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Like all other utilities, those whose usage is more will pay more, while those who use less will pay less on their bills. There are many irrigation tips that residents can use in order to keep their lawns healthy while also cutting back on water use.”

For additional information about water conservation and tips to save water around the home, please call (516) 931-6469 or visit the Plainview Water District website at www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

District Received More Than 300 Entries from POB Students

The Plainview Water District Board of Commissioners, Marc Laykind, Amanda Field, and Andrew Bader, are joined by all 18 winners of the 2021 PWD Water Conservation Poster Contest

Plainview, NY (June 17, 2021)— The Plainview Water District (PWD) is proud to announce the 18 winners of the 2021 water conservation poster contest. An annual tradition in the District, the poster contest is held in partnership with the Plainview Old Bethpage Central School District for students in grades 1 through 6. This poster contest is designed to be a fun activity that also provides an opportunity for students to learn about the importance of water conservation and our region’s sole-source aquifer.

“The Plainview Water District is extremely proud of the participation with this year’s contest and thanks the Plainview-Old Bethpage Central School District for their continued support in this effort,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “The students’ creativity and commitment to their posters is inspiring for myself and the rest of the Board of Commissioners as the future of our most precious natural resource is in good hands with the students in our community.”

The winners for the poster contest are as follows:

Grade 1

Ava Gaffan, Stratford Road School

Derek Scarcella, Stratford Road School

Sophie Schwartz, Stratford Road School

Grade 2

Parker Rosamilia, Old Bethpage School

Elena Choe, Stratford Road School

Anastasia Lin, Stratford Road School

Grade 3

Emmanuel Chin, Stratford Road School

Ryan Babich, Stratford Road School

Michael DiMarco, Stratford Road School

Grade 4

Marlee Cohen, Old Bethpage School

Rong Jia Lyla Lin, Stratford Road School

Lloyd Rhee, Stratford Road School

Grade 5

Grace Jung, POBMS

Joseph Lacerenza, POBMS

Joseph Cohen, POBMS

Grade 6

Shayna Argentina, POBMS

Alexis Szabo, POBMS

Ishi Rai, POBMS

“It was truly an honor to see all of the artistic skills and creativity of these students,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “Each year, the students of the POB community amaze us with both their designs and knowledge on what it takes to conserve water every day. During the warmer months, water conservation is of the utmost importance and it is so valuable to have the younger generations grasping what it means to cut back on water use and how to do it.”

Each year, the winners of the poster contest are determined after deliberation from the Board of Commissioners on creativity, design, and overall message of water conservation. This year featured both electronic and in-person design submissions, which led the District to collect more than 300 submissions from students, shattering the previous record of 170 in 2017. The District hosted an award ceremony on June 16th to honor the three winners from each grade.

“The Plainview Water District strives to instill the importance of water conservation with our residents through our Preserve Plainview initiative,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “This poster contest is an excellent way to educate our young community members on all of the simple, effective ways to make a big impact on saving our aquifers. Every single student who submitted a design should be very proud of themselves for their hard work, creativity, and their dedication to saving water.”

The finalists’ posters from each grade are available for viewing at https://plainviewwater.org/resources/kids-corner/2021-water-conservation-poster-contest-winning-entries/.

A Billion Gallons of Water Being Used to Keep Lawns and Gardens Green

Plainview Water District is Committed to Reducing Irrigation Water Use this Summer

Plainview, NY (May 26, 2021)— With irrigation systems now online and causing the community’s water demand to spike significantly, the Plainview Water District (PWD) is reminding residents of their responsibility to help Preserve Plainview through water conservation. Water usage and customer bills can triple during the summer due to irrigation systems coming online. As much of the water pumped is wasted in the process due to inefficient practices, the District is reminding all residents of the ways they can help to Preserve Plainview and help create a more sustainable water supply.

“Because our sprinkler systems typically go off during the hours we are asleep, most people don’t realize how much water they are using on a daily basis,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Our Preserve Plainview initiative aims to help our residents, not only realize just how much water their irrigation system is consuming to keep their lawn green, but provide them with the tools and tips to accomplish the same goal while using significantly less water.”

Last year, the District pumped more than 1.8 billion gallons of water to meet the needs of the 10,000 families it serves in the Plainview-Old Bethpage community. 1.1 billion gallons were pumped between May and September 2020, with most of that water being pumped between June and August. This spike of water pumpage can almost singularly be attributed to irrigation systems trying to keep up with the summer heat. This increase not only puts a strain on our region’s sole-source aquifer, but it significantly taxes the District’s supply and distribution system immensely as it tries to keep up with demand.

“It is pretty staggering when you look at the data and see how much water is being drawn from the ground to keep our lawns green,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “It is even more eye opening when you think of the massive expense this community shoulders from an infrastructure perspective just to make sure our systems have the capacity to handle this increased demand for this short period of time during the summer. Our goal with the Preserve Plainview initiative is to tell people not to water their lawns, but rather ensure they are doing so in an efficient, responsible manner.”

Installing a smart controller is the single greatest way to conserve a significant amount of water while keeping lawns and gardens healthy. By connecting with local weather stations and adjusting watering schedules based on the forecast, these systems better predict a lawn’s water needs, which is typically only an inch of water per week.

Residents are also urged to follow the Nassau County Lawn Watering Ordinances, which provide optimal times to water your lawn. The ordinance states that even-numbered homes can only water on even-numbered days, while odd-numbered homes can only water on odd-numbered days. Non-numbered homes follow the even-numbered homes schedule. It also states that no lawn watering can be done between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on any day.

The District also has more tips that can help residents promote a healthier lawn and garden this summer while also cutting back on water waste:

  • Nassau County’s ordinance also requires rain sensors on every lawn irrigation system. Make sure they are installed on your system and working properly.
  • Test your lawn irrigation system’s watering distance so that water is not hitting your house, going into the street, or beyond your property and lawn.
  • All hoses for exterior water use must be fitted with a hand-operated automatic-off nozzle valve.
  • The hosing of driveways, sidewalks, or streets is prohibited.
  • Reduce the amount of time you water during each irrigation zone.
  • Consider hiring a reputable lawn irrigation company to make sure your lawn is properly irrigated and that all of your equipment is operating efficiently.

“The adoption of water-saving technology, as well as the implementation of water conservation habits, will significantly reduce your overall water consumption,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Even if everyone in this community contributed to our conservation efforts in the smallest way, collectively they will have an enormous impact. Avoid the sticker shock of second, and, even more importantly, third quarter bills by implementing some of these tips into your daily routine.”

Please be advised that recent activity of monitoring well installation by the Department of Conservation (DEC) is not at all related to your drinking water. Upon recently learning about this work, we contacted the DEC and they have stated they are installing monitoring wells to sample the groundwater at depths of between 150 – 350 feet below grade. For reference, our supply wells are 500 feet or more in depth. These monitoring wells are a good thing as they provide accurate field data for tracking of a legacy spill from the former gas stations on Old Country Road and Plainview Road. The DEC projected any possible impact at over 100 years from now. The Plainview Water District is not involved in this activity, but we are monitoring its progress and will relay any information that is important for our community. Residents should rest assured that these activities DO NOT impact our supply wells and the intended purpose of a monitoring well is to ensure we know well in advance if our production facilities are to one day be impacted so we can prepare accordingly. Again, your water remains as safe as always to drink and its quality is not impacted whatsoever by this activity.

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is committed to ensuring all residents conserve water this summer and one of the ways they can do so is with responsible filling and maintenance of swimming pools. As part of its Preserve Plainview initiative, the District is providing a host of useful tips that will ensure water is not unnecessarily being wasted from a resident’s swimming pool.

“With so many residents in the Plainview-Old Bethpage community having pools, it is important to stay informed about some of the best practices for filling and maintaining their water levels,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Each summer, millions of gallons of water are wasted due to leaks and other inefficient practices. We hope that by raising awareness about some simple measures, we can start reversing this trend and cut down on this unnecessary water waste.”

Recommended Tips for Filling Pools:

  • Check for any possible holes or leaks in the liner before filling up.
  • Don’t leave the pool unattended when it is being filled. Someone should remain present at all times to avoid overfilling and expedite shut off in case of an emergency.
    • NEVER leave a pool filling overnight.
  • Pools should be covered when not in use. Hundreds of gallons of water per month can be lost due to evaporation.
  • Only add chemicals to the pool when it is full, and add only what you need according to the pool manual. This will avoid improper levels, which would cause you to empty out and refill the pool.
  • As an additional precaution, always use a hose connection vacuum breaker to prevent water flow reversal.
  • Always be mindful of children. Ensure your pool is properly fenced and has a pool alarm.

“Recent news reports have stated that the cost of chlorine is increasing and its availability is becoming more scarce,” added Commissioner Laykind. “Following each of these tips could also help out with conserving your chlorine supplies.”

Plainview Water District personnel will be conducting preventative maintenance operations on all hydrants district-wide from May 1st to approximately July 31st. This routine annual maintenance of our hydrants helps protect our community’s health and safety. This is not an extensive flushing operation. We will be pressure testing our hydrants and opening them briefly to ensure proper operation and readiness so that they will be fully functional by fire crews if needed.

When maintenance is being performed residents in the immediate vicinity of the work may experience temporary discoloration of their water. This discoloration primarily consists of harmless rust particles and does not affect the safety of the water. If you experience discoloration in your water after crews have been testing hydrants in your neighborhood, it is best to run your cold water tap at the lowest point of your home for 2 minutes or until it clears up.

Questions about hydrant testing can be directed to our customer service representatives by calling 516-931-6469 between the hours of 8am and 4pm Monday – Friday.

New Treatment System Specifically Designed to Remove 1,4-Dioxane

(From L-R) Nassau County Legislator Laura Schaefer, Business Manager Dina Scott, Superintendent Stephen Moriarty, Commissioner Andrew Bader, Commissioner Amanda Field, Chairman Marc Laykind, Nassau County Legislator Arnold Drucker, Town of Oyster Bay Councilman Louis Imbroto, and Nassau County Legislator Rose Walker

Plainview, NY (April 27, 2021)—The Plainview Water District (PWD), along with area elected officials, hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony to unveil the recently completed, state-of-the-art treatment facility that was specifically designed to remove the emerging contaminants 1,4-dioxane, PFOA and PFOS from the community’s drinking water. Plant 1, located at the District’s headquarters on Manetto Hill Road, is a $7.6 million facility capable of producing up to four million gallons of high-quality drinking water each and every day. The Plainview Water District has emerged as a leader in water treatment and has successfully put more Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) systems in place than any other water supplier on Long Island. 

“This is a significant moment for the Plainview-Old Bethpage community as it marks a major advancement in our abilities to provide our residents with the highest quality water for decades to come,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Even before talks about regulating these new contaminants started, we were working on plans to construct this facility. Here we are, several years later with the project completed, serving water to our customers that is in compliance with some of the strictest regulations in the country. It is a proud day for the water district and our community.”

In August 2020, the New York State Health Department finalized regulations establishing maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for emerging compounds 1,4-dioxane, PFOA and PFOS. The District started planning to build this treatment facility in 2018; at the same time the state started discussions about regulating these contaminants. Due to its proactive stance and sound financial planning, the District was able to fund this specific multi-million-dollar investment without impacting rates by using reserve accounts as well as receiving a $2.1 million grant the District was awarded from the state.  

“We are proud to be one of the first water providers to have an operational AOP system and one of the few water suppliers impacted by emerging contaminants that did not need additional time to come into compliance,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “The Plainview Water District has put in a tremendous amount of time and effort to ensure that treatment was in place well before the regulations went into effect. Seeing the fruits of our teams’ labor is truly remarkable, especially when you consider what it means for our community.”

The treatment technology needed to remove 1,4-dioxane is called the Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP). It works by adding a small amount of an oxidant into the water—in this case hydrogen peroxide—that passes through an ultraviolet light reactor destroying the 1,4-dioxane molecules. From there, the water then travels through Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) filtration—industrial-sized carbon filters—so the remaining detections of the oxidant as well as other volatile organic compounds can be removed before water goes through the rest of the treatment and delivery process. This treatment duo, which is also effective at removing PFOA and PFOS, is the only method approved by state and local health departments to remove these synthetic compounds.

“This has been a herculean effort by our staff and our engineers to bring this facility from drawings into real life,” said PWD commissioner Andrew Bader. “This plant was built for longevity, meaning, over time, it will produce billions of gallons of the highest-quality drinking water for the Plainview-Old Bethpage community. By investing in our water, we are investing in our community for generations to come.”

For more information about emerging contaminants and the steps the District has taken thus far, please visit plainviewwater.org/resources/emerging-contaminants/. If you have questions or seek additional information, please call the District at 516-931-6469 or email info@plainviewwater.org. Residents are also encouraged to sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

District Offers Homeowners Water- and Money-Saving Tips As Irrigation Season is Set to Begin


“Outdoor water usage is the single largest contributor to the District’s increased pumpage between May and September,” said Marc Laykind, Chairman of the Plainview Water District. “To accommodate for the increased use, we have to use every bit of our infrastructure to meet demand and that each drop meets all federal, state and local guidelines. If every resident could introduce a new water-saving measure this summer it would go a long way in preserving our most precious natural resource.”

Irrigation clocks that are set in April and then not touched again until they are turned off in the fall are primed to waste thousands upon thousands of gallons of water. This is because a lawn’s water needs are drastically different in April than they are in July. A trick to keep in mind is to set irrigation clocks every time the thermostat is adjusted. A less time-consuming option is to consider technologies such as a rain sensor or a smart controller. Smart controllers replace standard irrigation timers and use Wi-Fi to connect to a local weather station to use data to adjust watering schedules and amounts accordingly.

“We pump more than 100 percent more water in the spring and summer than we do the rest of the year, and it’s essentially all attributed to lawn sprinkler systems,” said Plainview Water District Commissioner Amanda Field. “That is why it is so important for residents to understand how to optimize their home irrigation systems. Their efforts will not only contribute to the long-term sustainability of our aquifer, but it will have a real impact on their second and third quarter water bills.”

Plainview Old-Bethpage residents are also reminded of Nassau County’s Lawn Watering Ordinances, which dictates when homeowners can and cannot water their lawns. The ordinance stipulates that even-numbered homes can only water on even-numbered days, odd-numbered homes can only water on odd-numbered days, and no lawn watering can be done between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on any day.

“There are so many ways to cut back on water usage that might not seem significant, but over time they can amount to big savings,” said Plainview Water District Commissioner Andrew Bader. “No effort is too small to consider as every gallon adds up over time. If you identify an area where you and your family can save water, go for it. The less water we use now, the better shape our aquifer will be for generations to come.”

For Women’s History Month, the Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to honor two members of its management team that play crucial roles in the oversight and management of the District. Commissioner Amanda Field and Business Manager Dina Scott both have important responsibilities in the District’s day-to-day operations and have helped to lead the direction of many of the District’s advances over the past couple of years. 

“It is an honor to serve my community and play an important role in Long Island’s water industry as a female since it has historically been a male-dominated field,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “I am proud of the work that myself and the other amazing women of the Plainview Water District have been able to accomplish over the years and look forward to the continued trend of women entering water-related occupations.” 

Commissioner Amanda Field has served on the board of the PWD since winning her initial election in 2016. As a PWD Commissioner, Field—with her fellow commissioners—has led the District to install state-of-the-art treatment technology to remove 1,4-dioxane, PFOA and PFOS ahead of the state’s extremely untenable timeline. She has also been instrumental in launching the District’s Preserve Plainview campaign that aims to bring awareness and educate the many ways residents can protect the region’s sole-source aquifer. In addition, she has spearheaded several initiatives with the local school districts to provide younger generations with a greater appreciation for their community’s most precious natural resource: water. 

Dina Scott, CPA, joined the District in 2017 to assume the role as Business Manager. Ms. Scott uses her more than 16 years of experience in governmental accounting and auditing to oversee all budgetary and financial operations of the District and provides guidance on all related matters. Prior to joining the District, Dina was a supervisor for the well-respected accounting firm where she specialized in governmental services for local municipalities, including local water providers. She is a licensed Certified Public Accountant and holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting from St. Joseph’s College. 

To learn more about the Plainview Water District, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive District updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org and also follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

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Plainview Water District Commissioner Amanda Field

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Plainview Water District Business Manager Dina Scott, CPA

Plainview Water District Urges Residents to be Responsible With Lawn Chemicals and Fertilizers 

Plainview, NY (March 11, 2021)—As part of its Preserve Plainview initiative, the Plainview Water District would like to remind residents about the impacts that premature and excessive lawn fertilizing has on our environment and water supply. The District implores all residents to be mindful of the Nassau County “Fertilizer Law” that prohibits fertilizing prior to April 1 of each year.

“You can have a green lawn without over-fertilizing or fertilizing too early in the season,” said Plainview Water District Chairman Marc Laykind. “To help protect our sole-source aquifer and other local waterways, we ask residents to adhere to Nassau County’s fertilizer law to help support our efforts of environmental protection.”

In accordance with Nassau County’s “Fertilizer Law,” all fertilizers are prohibited from being applied before April 1, 2021 and after November 15, 2021. Residents should always apply the minimum amount of lawn chemicals to the soil and make sure they are stored properly. Additionally, all fertilizers or other lawn chemicals must be kept in cool and dry locations inside of containers that are not prone to leaks. By following instructions listed on the packaging, homeowners can minimize the amount of fertilizer used while at the same time limiting the impact on the environment.

“Our weather is unpredictable this time of year and our region always seems to get an end-of-March snowstorm or cold snap,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Applying fertilizers on frozen ground, or right before the ground refreezes, will take the fertilizers off your lawn and into our waterways. Save your money and our environment by ensuring you fertilize at the right time.”

Organic fertilizers—such as cotton seed meal, bone meal and manure—are other examples of effective alternatives to typical fertilizers that will benefit the environment. Biodegradable insecticides that break down to harmless substances in 2-to-21 days are also another effective yet safe way to treat your lawn.

“Purchasing the right type of fertilizer is as important as when you apply it to your lawn,” added PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “We want people to remember that the water we drink comes from beneath our feet so the more chemicals and toxins we put on the ground, the more likely they are to leach into our groundwater. Increased nitrogen levels in our groundwater will require advanced and costly treatment systems to ensure our water remains at the highest quality. This is why we urge people to use natural, organic fertilizers over fertilizers packed with harmful chemicals.” 

Plainview, NY (March 2, 2021)—There aren’t many things more important than water, which is why the Plainview Water District Board of Commissioners would like to remind the Plainview-Old Bethpage community the importance of signing-up and/or confirm their contact information with the District. Ensuring that each resident has provided the District with accurate contact information allows residents to receive emergency notifications about their water service should a situation ever arise.

“The District has the systems in place to immediately reach our residents should a water-related issue occur; however, we can only do so if we have our residents’ up-to-date contact information on file.” said PWD Board Chairman Marc Laykind. “There is nothing more important to us than the well-being of our community and having the ability to quickly inform residents in the event of an emergency is a crucial part of the equation.”

The District’s reverse-911 system, provided by SwiftReach Networks, is capable of delivering urgent messages directly to residents via phone, text or email. By having residents submit their most up-to-date contact information, the District’s reverse-911 system will be able to contact residents and business owners with information regarding water-related emergencies. All information is securely stored in District databases and is only used in the case of an emergency.

To ensure a resident is signed up to receive emergency notifications or to confirm their contact information is accurate, please visit www.plainviewwater.org and fill out the appropriate form under the tab for “Resources” and then “Emergency Notification System.”  The contact information received will only be accessed in the aforementioned circumstances and will be kept confidential. Residents can also update or confirm the information on file by calling the District at 516-931-6469.

Plainview Water District Quick to Repair Any Breaks

The Plainview Water District would like to remind residents that water main breaks occur more often during the winter months, but are a completely normal experience for this time of year. Fortunately, the District has a highly trained staff that is capable of quickly addressing these potentially emergency situations to a degree where nearby residents may not even know a break has

“Water main breaks are an unfortunate reality in any area that experiences extreme cold, and Long Island certainly qualifies,” said Marc Laykind, chairman of the Plainview Water District. “The good news is that we in the Plainview Water District have an experienced staff that responds to breaks 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to minimize any potential interruptions to your water supply as much as possible.”  

As the case with all cold-weather climates, water main breaks are an unfortunate reality as they typically occur when there is movement in the soil surrounding the water pipes or a freeze/thawing condition. Water mains are installed below the frost line; however, when the soil shrinks or swells it places pressure on the pipes causing a break. Though the length of time to repair a leak varies from incident to incident depending on its severity and how quickly the leak can be located, PWD employees are trained to repair all types of breaks efficiently, quickly and safely.

“Water main breaks present an opportunity for residents to experience a drop in water pressure or discolored water,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “Luckily, both of these are temporary as our dedicated crews react quickly to each break and do whatever they can to limit potential interruptions to our residents’ water service while the repair is being made.” 

When water service is restored, residents may notice air in their pipes and the water may be discolored. The discoloration is not harmful, but can stain laundry. If you experience discolored water, let the cold water run from a faucet or tub at the closest area to your incoming service line for a few minutes or until it clears. 

“While we have systems in place to learn about main breaks shortly after they occur, there are situations where they are not easily detected,” said PWD Commission Andrew Bader. “Anytime someone suspects there may be a water main break in their neighborhood, they should never hesitate to contact us and report the situation. The quicker we can locate a break, the quicker we can respond to it, and the quicker the issue can be resolved. While most main breaks are not dire emergencies, they can lead to one if left unattended.”

The Plainview Water District asks for residents’ help in reporting potential main breaks. Residents that notice areas of wetness along the curb, bubbling of water in the roadway or unexplainable icy conditions are encouraged to contact the Plainview Water District immediately at 516-931-6469. 

PWD Chairman Marc Laykind re-elected to serve for three more years

Commissioner Andrew Bader elected chairman of the Long Island Water Conference

Commissioner Amanda Field elected president of the Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association

Plainview, NY (January 19, 2021)—The Plainview Water District (PWD) is proud to announce that all three of its commissioners have recently won important elections throughout Long Island’s water industry. Chairman Marc Laykind won his re-election bid to continue serving on the Plainview Water District’s board of commissioners. Additionally, Commissioner Andrew Bader was elected to serve as the chairman of the Long Island Water Conference (LIWC) and Commissioner Amanda Field was elected to serve as the president of the Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association (NSWCA). All three of Plainview’s commissioners now hold leadership roles within Long Island’s water industry.

Commissioner Laykind now enters his 3rd term as a PWD Commissioner. He has been a part of the Plainview-Old Bethpage (POB) community for over 27 years and, as Chairman, he is committed to ensuring that our public water supply is of the highest quality and affordable for residents. Laykind is an active member of the Long Island Water Conference and Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association. In addition to his water district responsibilities, Laykind is a practicing attorney.

“I personally want to thank all of the Plainview-Old Bethpage residents who continue to put their trust in me to oversee our most precious natural resource,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “I’d also like to congratulate my fellow commissioners, Andrew Bader and Amanda Field, for their appointments to chair the these two highly respected organizations that advance water causes for all Long Islanders. This is big for our District as it not only speaks to the work that we have collectively been able to accomplish here in Plainview, but the impact it has had on Long Island’s water industry as a whole.”

Andrew Bader has proudly served the POB community as Commissioner of the water district since 2010. Mr. Bader has worked tirelessly in his tenure to ensure Plainview residents are served the highest quality water possible while also helping to push for greater conservation measures to preserve this important natural resource for future generations. Commissioner Bader is also the former president of the Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association and a member of the American Water Works Association. By day, Mr. Bader a Vice President at Mercury Tax Service, Inc.

“In addition to my responsibilities as a Plainview Water District commissioner, I am truly honored to hold this leadership role at the Long Island Water Conference and continue to advance the needs of our industry for the betterment of our communities and all the residents of Long Island,” said Commissioner Andrew Bader. “We will continue to work very hard this year and beyond to make sure that all Long Islanders continue to receive the highest quality water.”

Commissioner Amanda Field has served on the board of the PWD since winning her initial election in 2016. As a PWD Commissioner, Field has led several initiatives with the local school districts to provide younger generations with a greater appreciation for their community’s most precious natural resource: water. These efforts have led to a more robust list of opportunities for students of all ages to learn about the operations of the PWD and their water supply. Commissioner Field is also recognized for her leadership role in implementing the District’s Preserve Plainview campaign that aims to bring awareness and educate the many ways residents can protect our region’s sole-source aquifer. During her tenure with both the LIWC and NSWCA, Commissioner Field has worked to educate area elected officials on the issues surrounding the water industry and was instrumental in successfully fighting for the availability of grant funding for new treatment facilities.

“I appreciate the support of my colleagues in the water industry and the confidence they have placed in me to lead the NSWCA for the next year,” said Commissioner Amanda Field. “As president, I will bring the same energy and apply my experiences as a commissioner in Plainview to advocate for the issues impacting all commissioner-run water district’s throughout Long Island including initiatives to improve water quality and access to funding for treatment projects.”

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive District updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org and also follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

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Caption: (L-R) – PWD Commissioners Marc Laykind, Amanda Field and Andrew Bader. 

As the Plainview community prepares for snow in the forecast as we jump into the colder months, the Plainview Water District (PWD) would like to remind its residents about the importance of keeping fire hydrants clear. Ensuring hydrants remain free of snow and any other winter debris can save first responders valuable time during their response to an emergency situation.

“The winter weather arriving always provides us with an opportunity to remind our residents and local business owners of the importance of keeping hydrants clear,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “Making sure the fire department has quick and easy access to fire hydrants at all times saves precious moments that should be used to responding to an emergency.”

Residents can “adopt” a nearby fire hydrant to pledge responsibility for reporting issues and making sure it kept clear during snowstorms. Clearing approximately three feet around the hydrant will provide both firefighters with uninterrupted access in case of a potential emergency. This provides plenty of room for the emergency personnel to operate the device as well as locate it.

“You never know when or where an emergency is going to occur so never assume that they fire hydrant in front of your home won’t be needed,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “We also encourage residents to never assume someone else will clear the hydrant so please communicate with your neighbors to ensure it is cleared in a timely fashion.”

In addition, the Plainview Water District asks residents to also consider assisting neighbors, family members and friends who are unable to clear their own fire hydrants without assistance. Residents who leave their homes for the winter season are asked to notify a neighbor who can make sure someone is responsible for clearing it in their absence.

“The safety of our community is always our foremost priority, which is why we are so emphatic about making sure this simple yet vital step is not overlooked,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “We appreciate the attention of our residents on this simple, yet crucial, task.”

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org. Follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

The cold winter months are upon us and the Plainview Water District would like to provide residents with some helpful tips to prepare their homes’ water system. When exposed to cold weather, water systems that are not properly prepared or winterized can be subject to breaks and/or leaks. Residents are encouraged to utilize these tips to protect their homes from any damage or disruptions caused by frozen pipes.

“Preparing your home’s water system for the colder weather is very simple, but failing to take these steps can cause problems down the road,” said Chairman Marc Laykind. “We ask everyone in the District to use this information as a guide to avoid a big and unnecessary frustration that frozen pipes can cause.”

Outdoor Water Systems:

Don’t forget to turn off those hose spigots from inside the house and leave the outside valves open to prevent freezing. This allows any trapped water to expand in freezing temperatures, preventing the pipe from bursting. Disconnect and drain all hoses and keep in a warm, dry place for reuse in the spring.

Sprinkler Systems:

Sprinkler systems should be winterized to prevent possible leaks and damage to the system. Leaks in sprinkler systems caused by burst pipes can be hard to identify when the systems return back on line, leading to increased water usage and decreased functionality.

Indoor Maintenance:

If a customer’s water service is in the boiler room or basement, check the area for broken windows or drafts. Brisk winds and freezing temperatures can cause pipes and water meters to freeze or break. In preparation, locate the main water shutoff valve in your home in case of an emergency and make sure pipes in unheated areas—like crawl spaces—are properly insulated.

It is also advised that all customers clearly label the main water shutoff valve in their home so they are prepared in the event of a water leak emergency. Shutoff valves are typically located where the water service enters the house through the foundation.

Water Lines Leading to Unheated Structures:

Be sure to shut off and drain service lines leading to any unheated structures until spring to prevent breaks.

If you have questions about preparing your home’s water system for the winter or general inquiries about your water service, please call 516-931-6469 or send an email to info@plainviewwater.org. Customers of the Plainview Water District are also encouraged to sign up to receive updates by visiting www.plainviewwater.org. Follow the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/plainviewwater.

Plant #2 is the First of Four District Facilities to Operate the State-of-the-Art Advanced Oxidation Process Treatment

The Plainview Water District (PWD) is proud to announce that its first advanced oxidation process (AOP) treatment system is operational after receiving approval from the New York State Department of Health. AOP treatment, along with granular activated carbon (GAC), is the only treatment combination proven to remove 1,4-dioxane from drinking water. PWD’s Plant #2 is the first of four production facilities to receive the treatment duo that is now producing water with non-detectable levels of 1,4-dioxane ahead of the State’s compliance deadline.   

“This is a watershed moment for the Plainview Water District and our community as a whole,” said PWD Chairman Marc Laykind. “We have been dedicated to the development of these AOP treatment projects each and every day for more than two years so it is extremely gratifying to have our first system up and running. Being in this position today is no small feat—this came together because of this District’s comprehensive planning and execution all in the name of providing higher-quality water to Plainview-Old Bethpage residents.”

On August 26, 2020, the New York State Health Department finalized regulations that will take effect later this year. These regulations established maximum contaminant levels (MCL) for emerging compounds 1,4-dioxane, PFOA and PFOS. This action makes New York the first and only state in the country with an enforceable MCL for 1,4-dioxane. The District has been working tirelessly for the past several years to formulate and implement their aggressive action plan to have the required treatment systems constructed and secure the funding for these costly capital improvements. The District’s diligent efforts make them one of the few water providers on Long Island with an operational AOP system for the removal of 1,4-dioxane.

“We are proud to be one of the first Nassau County water providers to have an operational AOP system,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “The Plainview Water District has put in a tremendous amount of time and effort to ensure we are in the position we are today. With construction completed at the other impacted well sites, we will be able to get them up and running as soon as we receive the required approvals from the health department.”

While Plant #2 is the first PWD water supply and treatment site to have a completed AOP and GAC system, construction of treatment systems at Plants #1, #3 and #7 are also completed. These systems cannot be turned on until approval is given from the New York State Department of Health. However, the District is expecting to have the necessary approvals for these remaining treatment facilities in the near future.

“Even though there is a provision that could provide water providers with an additional three years to come into compliance with the new regulations, our plan was always to have treatment up and running as soon as possible.” stated PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Water quality is, and will always be, our foremost concern and we will continue to make whatever infrastructure improvements are necessary to deliver water to our residents that meets or surpasses all water quality guidelines.”

Even with widespread power outages caused by Tropical Storm Isaias, the water in Plainview never stopped flowing

Plainview, N.Y. (September 15, 2020)—The impacts of our region’s hurricane season varies from year to year, but with the impacts already experienced by Tropical Storm Isaias, the Plainview Water District is prepared for any extreme weather event allowing the community to experience zero water service interruptions. Due to the District’s planning and extensive precautionary measures, the community’s drinking water remains protected and never stops flowing, even with widespread and lengthy periods of time without power.

“The District has taken many short-term and long-term planning measures over the past several years that have prepared us to handle any severe weather event,” said Board Chairman Marc Laykind. “We realize that the last thing our residents need in a severe weather event is for their water to stop running. This is why we have taken every proactive action necessary to ensure our community always has access to high-quality drinking water.”

In the event of a power outage, the Plainview Water District has its own emergency electrical generator facilities, which are consistently maintained and always on standby to keep water flowing in case of a severe weather event. These generators keep pumps and treatment facilities online without interruption during a severe weather event. In addition, District staff members are well trained to utilize all emergency equipment as well as handle a diverse list of emergency situations, including the recent tropical storm.

“In the case of any severe weather event, our facilities and staff are prepared to act swiftly around the clock,” added Commissioner Andrew Bader. “Our response plan, which includes the mobilization of emergency response teams, water testing laboratories and water main repair contractors, are always on standby so they can be implemented within a moment’s notice.”

The District is also a member of New York’s statewide Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network (NYWARN) of utilities that supports and promotes statewide emergency preparedness, disaster response and mutual aid for public and private water and wastewater utilities. As a member of NYWARN, neighboring water suppliers from across the state provide emergency assistance when necessary.

“Even though our systems rely on electricity to operate, we do not put all of our eggs in the power company’s basket,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “When needed, like in event where power outages are widespread throughout the region, we can be completely self-sufficient. This is the type of service our residents have come to expect, and frankly, the type of service they deserve.”

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469 email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. Residents can also sign up to receive information by submitting their email address through the District’s homepage or following them on Facebook in order to stay up-to-date with District activities and initiatives.

Plainview Water District personnel will be conducting preventative maintenance operations on all hydrants district-wide from May 1st to approximately July 31st. This routine annual maintenance of our hydrants helps protect our community’s health and safety. This is not an extensive flushing operation. We will be pressure testing our hydrants and opening them briefly to ensure proper operation and readiness so that they will be fully functional by fire crews if needed.

When maintenance is being performed residents in the immediate vicinity of the work may experience temporary discoloration of their water. This discoloration primarily consists of harmless rust particles and does not affect the safety of the water. If you experience discoloration in your water after crews have been testing hydrants in your neighborhood, it is best to run your cold water tap at the lowest point of your home for 2 minutes or until it clears up.

Questions about hydrant testing can be directed to our customer service representatives by calling 516-931-6469 between the hours of 8am and 4pm Monday – Friday.

Dear Long Island residents,

Foremost, we hope that everyone is staying safe and abiding by all health recommendations from the World Health Organization and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. While this COVID-19 outbreak has changed much of our daily lives, it will not hinder our unbreakable spirit to better serve the communities we love.

Responsible for delivering high-quality drinking water to more than 3.5 million residents in Nassau and Suffolk Counties, the membership of both the Long Island Water Conference (LIWC) and Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association (NSWCA) reassures every Long Islander that your drinking water is and will remain unaffected by the COVID-19 outbreak. There is no need to be stocking up and hoarding bottled water.

Aside from standard treatment measures that would inactivate the virus (there are no known COVID-19 detections in any water source throughout the globe), our organizations have worked in lockstep with one another to quickly put in place necessary precautions to promote the health and safety of our residents and employees. Water providers across Long Island implemented temporary policies that closed public facing facilities and restricted the entry of employees to a resident’s home for anything other than an absolute emergency. We rearranged work schedules to better promote social distancing and have isolated key water plant operators to the greatest extent possible. The communication within our industry has been constant since the start of the outbreak to ensure that every water supplier has the personnel, equipment and supplies to see them through this situation now and into the future.

Like doctors, nurses, EMS personnel, police officers and firefighters, employees of water providers are essential and we do not have the luxury of staying away from the field. Regardless of the situation, well pumps and treatment facilities need to be checked daily, water samples from the distribution systems are routinely gathered to ensure quality and water main breaks must be fixed expeditiously to minimize service impacts. Regardless of what stops in the world around us, we must continue marching as every single person relies on us completing our daily tasks.

To the men and women of the water industry who continue to show up regardless of the situation and provide Long Islanders the stability of an uninterrupted supply of water in these uncertain times, thank you. Your efforts, professionalism and dedication to the invaluable roll you play in our society is very much appreciated. Time and time again you have proven that there is no situation or emergency we aren’t prepared to handle.

Sincerely,

Richard Passariello, Chairman, Long Island Water Conference

William Schuckmann, Chairman, Nassau Suffolk Water Commissioners Association

Out of an abundance of caution and in the spirit of protecting public health, effective immediately the Plainview Water District will not be accepting payments inside of the District office in any form. Additionally, the office will be closed to the public until further notice.

Please be advised the payment drop box immediately outside of the entry door is available for you to remit payment. We encourage you to utilize other methods of payment such as postal mail, online payments, or enrolling in automatic bill payments.

Please feel free to contact us at 516-931-6469 if you have any questions.

We thank you for your understanding and cooperation.

As Seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – January 29 – February 4, 2020

As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – January 22 – 28, 2020

As Seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – January 15 – 21, 2020

Several talented students at the Plainview-Old Bethpage High School created this video explaining the journey of a drop of water. Watch the video!

Plainview Water District’s Continues Its Pursuit of Treatment Funding with Latest Grant Award of $3.7 Million

In its ongoing pursuit to leverage all possible funding opportunities, the Plainview Water District (PWD) was recently awarded $3.7 million to continue implementing necessary treatment to remove emerging contaminants, most notably 1,4-dioxane. This is the fourth grant award the District has received in three years amounting to a collective total of $9 million for advanced treatment projects.

“Once again, we thank Governor Cuomo and the New York State Legislature for making this significant funding available to water providers for the installation of state-of-the-art treatment upgrades,” said PWD Board Chairman Marc Laykind. “With expenses related to the removal of emerging contaminants—primarily 1,4-dioxane—mounting, we are very proud of the work our team has done to secure this funding to lessen the financial burden on our community.”

The $3.7 million in grant award will go towards the District’s planned $6.1 million investment in treatment upgrades at Plant 2. The upgrades include the installation of a new treatment technology called the Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) system which is needed to remove 1,4-dioxane from drinking water. In addition, a Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) filtration system—an industrial-sized carbon filter—will also be installed at the site. This treatment combination is the only approved method to successfully remove detections of 1,4-dioxane and any potential treatment byproducts from the drinking water.

This round of infrastructure funding was part of a recent announcement from Governor Cuomo that provided more than $416 million for water and wastewater projects across New York State. More than $120 million of this funding has been specifically allocated to help communities across Long Island fund treatment projects for emerging contaminants. In 2017, Governor Cuomo and the State Legislature passed the Clean Water Infrastructure Act that dedicated $2.5 billion in wastewater and drinking water projects and water quality protection across New York State.

“The infrastructure investment needed to ensure the removal of these emerging contaminants is expensive and makes the importance of this funding that much more significant,” said PWD Commissioner Andrew Bader. “We will be conducting a rate study to determine what will be the least impactful method for paying off treatment-related bond expenses. Our successful grants awards are cutting into the amount we have to pay back in a real and noticeable way.”

Prior to the New Year, the New York State Health Department announced a rule change to its proposed regulations to establish a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for 1,4-dioxane and perfluorinated compounds (PFAS). This rule change, if passed, would provide water providers with a maximum of three years to come into compliance with the MCL regulations. 

“We are already deeply entrenched in our action plan to improve the treatment facilities throughout our District to ensure 1,4-dioxane and other emerging contaminants are removed from our water,” said PWD Commissioner Amanda Field. “Even though state health regulators are proposing to provide all water providers with up to three years to get the treatment systems up and running, we are not taking our foot off the gas pedal. Our goal and primary focus is to have the necessary treatment implemented by the end of  this summer.”

The Plainview Water District recently launched an Emerging Contaminants Resource Page that contains in-depth and up-to-date content about 1,4-dioxane and PFAS. The District encourages anyone with questions about these emerging contaminants to visit plainviewwater.org/resources/emergingcontaminants.

For further information, or if you have any questions, please call the District at 516-931-6469, email info@plainviewwater.org or visit www.plainviewwater.org. To receive regular updates from the Plainview Water District, please sign up for email updates on the District’s homepage. Don’t forget to stay connected to the Plainview Water District on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PlainviewWaterDistrict


MORE ABOUT EMERGING CONTAMINANT TREATMENT

AOP treatment blends raw groundwater with a low concentration of an oxidant—most commonly hydrogen peroxide—that then goes through a sophisticated ultraviolet light reactor to destroy the 1,4-dixoane molecules. Once groundwater goes through the AOP process, water is then piped into GAC vessels. GAC vessels—which are industrial-sized carbon filters—remove any remaining hydrogen peroxide and other VOCs form the water. After GAC treatment, water is chlorinated for disinfection, pH is adjusted then tested before being delivered to residents’ taps.

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As seen in the Plainview – Old Bethpage Herald – December 11 – 17, 2019

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